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Church and reform in Scotland; a history from 1797 to 1843.

Author: William Law Mathieson
Publisher: Glasgow, J. Maclehose, 1916.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Genre/Form: Church history
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mathieson, William Law, 1868-1938.
Church and reform in Scotland.
Glasgow, J. Maclehose, 1916
(OCoLC)559737149
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: William Law Mathieson
OCLC Number: 1226616
Notes: This work with the author's "Politics and religion", "Scotland and the union" and "The awakening of Scotland", forms a continuous history of Scotland from 1550-1843. cf. Pref.
Description: xii, 378 pages 24 cm
Contents: Introduction --
Democracy a product of the French Revolution --
Feudal constitution of Scotland --
Antagonism of Scots and English --
Growth of British nationality --
The awakening of industry --
The political awakening --
Intellectual activity --
Its anti-popular bias --
Exceptions: Hutcheson --
Adam Smith --
John Miller --
Dugald Stewart --
Anti-patronage movement in the church --
Evangelicalism --
1. The evangelical revival --
Individualism the principle of the Reformation --
Growth of theocracy in Scotland --
The Leighton school --
Henry Scougal --
His influence on the Oxford Methodists --
Novelty and startling effect of their preaching --
Wesley and Whitefield as dissenters; their separation --
Evangelicalism within the Church of England --
Its decline in Scotland; Hutcheson --
Whitefield in Scotland ; Cambuslang --
Evangelicalism divorced from theocracy --
Wesley and the Wesleyans in Scotland --
Scottish and English evangelicalism contrasted --
Drawing-room evangelicalism; Lady Maxwell --
Lady Glenorch --
Lady Leven and John Campbell --
The French Revolution --
Voluntaryism in the relief church --
The Seceders abandon the covenant --
Evangelicals and parliamentary reform --
The brothers Haldane ; Congregationalism --
Rowland Hill --
Intellectual character of the movement 2. The decline of moderatism --
Influences unfavourable to Moderatism --
patronage controversy dormant --
The London Foreign Missionary Society --
Foreign mission movement in Scotland --
Scottish mission to West Africa --
Chapels of ease --
Sunday schools --
Regulations as to students and licentiates --
Clerical censorship of education --
Lay preaching --
Plurality and non-residence; the Arnot case --
Clergymen as professors --
The Leslie controversy --
Principal Hill; his career and policy --
Finlayson, the business manager --
Clergymen as politicians: Robert Ure --
Moderatism in its relation to the government --
Party struggles; the eldership --
Relaxation of discipline --
Patronage less liberal in spirit --
Moderatism the victim of culture --
3. War and repression, 1797-1820 --
Character of the war --
The volunteers --
The Militia Act, 1707 --
Threatened invasion --
The Whig party in Scotland --
The Edinburgh Review --
Melville impeached; the Whigs in power --
The court of session --
Proposals for its reform --
The old and the young Whigs --
Francis Horner --
Henry Peter Brougham --
Distress of the cotton-weavers --
Their strike, 1812 --
Effect on industry of the peace --
Distress and disorder in England and Scotland --
The Glasgow Radicals --
Richmond the spy --
Political trials, 1817 --
Renewed distress, 1819; "Manchester Massacre" --
Meetings and rots in Glasgow and Paisley --
Attempted risings --
"The Radical War," 1820 --
Bonnymuir; riot at Greenock --
Failure of liberalism on the continent 4. Progress of the Whigs, 1820-1827 --
Whigs and Radicals; their distinctive principles --
Newspapers; the Scotsman --
Growing popularity of the Whigs --
The Pantheon meeting and the Fox dinner, 1820-1821 --
Burgh Reform; Montrose, 1817 --
Bankruptcy of Aberdeen --
Burgh Reform in Parliament, 1819-1822 --
The Edinburgh Review and the Quarterly --
The Beacon --
The Glasgow Sentinel --
The king's visit, 1822 --
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine --
Reform of the criminal jury --
The Edinburgh police --
County representation --
The representation of Edinburgh --
Canning, 1827; his relations with the Whigs --
The Whigs as a centre party --
5. The reform bills, 1827-1834 --
The second Lord Melville --
Scottish Toryism breaking up --
Wellington; the "July Revolution," 1830 --
Earl Grey; the English Reform Bill, 1831 --
The Scottish representation --
Reform movement in Scotland --
The struggle for reform at Westminster --
The general election of 1831 --
Excitement; election riots --
Demonstrations against the lords --
The first Scottish reform bill --
The bill as it became law --
Criticisms and amendments --
The new constituencies --
The Burgh Reform Acts --
Lord Grey in Scotland, 1834 --
Character and significance of the movement 6. Social conditions --
Lord Brougham and Lord Durham in Scotland --
The Scottish radicals --
Strike of the Glasgow cotton-spinners --
The leaders tried and transported --
Disclosures made at the trial --
Chartism in Scotland --
Social condition of Glasgow --
The Scottish Poor Law --
Its burdens evaded by the rich --
Dr. Chalmer's scheme of voluntary relief --
Dr. Alison and the New Poor Law --
Primitive conditions in the far north --
Telford's schemes of road-making --
The "Sutherland clearances" --
Wick and the northern fisheries --
7. The religious reaction --
Growth of pietism after the peace --
Scepticism amongst the Whigs --
Thomas Chalmers ; his early career --
Movement against plurality, 1813-1825 --
The Indian mission, 1824 --
The apocrypha controversy --
Andrew Thomson and spiritual independence --
Re-union of the Seceders, 1820 --
Alienation of evangelicals and dissenters --
The annuity tax --
Politics as a cause of the alienation --
Voluntaries and disestablishment --
Patronage question revived --
Veto and Chapel Acts, 1834 --
Evangelical ascendancy secured --
Church extension --
The demand for additional endowments --
Chalmers and the choice of a moderator, 1837 --
Offer of assistance from the teinds, 1838 --
Chalmers a an orator --
His intellectual limitations 8. The church and the law, 1837-1843 --
The Veto Act, 1834 --
The Auchterarder Case, 1837 --
The church claims spiritual independence --
Commemoration of the Glasgow Assembly, 1838 --
The non-intrusionists compared with the covenanters --
Their sentimental view of Scottish history --
Auchterarder judgment confirmed, 1839 --
The church adheres to the Veto Act --
Claims the pastorage, but not the stipend --
The Lethendy Case --
Marnoch and Strathbogie --
Scottish Presbytery and Anglican Episcopacy --
The Oxford Movement --
Attitude of the Whig government --
The church and the Tories --
Lord Aberdeen as mediator; his bill, 1840 --
The non-intrusionists opposed by the moderates --
Their view of church and state --
Public opinion against them --
Except in the highlands; "the men" --
The Marnoch ordination, 1841 --
Candlish disqualified for a professorship --
Reaction against the veto --
The Duke of Argyll's Bill --
Strathbogie ministers deposed --
Memorial to Sir Robert Peel --
Sir George Sinclair's proposal; "The forty" --
The Culsamond Case --
Sir James Graham and the Sinclair clause --
The Claim of Right, 1842 --
The second Austerarder Case --
The Convocation --
The Chapel Act and the Stewarton Case, 1843 --
The Claim of Right rejected by Parliament --
Chalmers resumes the leadershp --
His financial schemes --
Secession, not disruption --
An impraticable ideal --
Concluson.

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