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Citation and modernity : Derrida, Joyce, and Brecht

Author: Claudette Sartiliot
Publisher: Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 1995, ©1993.
Series: Oklahoma project for discourse and theory, v. 13.
Edition/Format:   eBook : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This is the first modern study of the phenomenon of quotation, about which very little has been written in English. Until the end of the nineteenth century, or at least until Flaubert, most writers relied on the traditional definition of quotation derived from classical rhetoric, employing citations as ornaments or illustrations. Claudette Sartiliot argues that for modernist and postmodernist writers quotation  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Sartiliot, Claudette, 1945-
Citation and modernity.
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c1993
(DLC) 92050721
(OCoLC)27429516
Named Person: Jacques Derrida; James Joyce; Bertolt Brecht
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Claudette Sartiliot
ISBN: 0585283362 9780585283364
OCLC Number: 45727865
Description: 1 online resource (188 p.)
Contents: The eclipse of quotation and the advent of modernity --
Glas: an epigrammatology --
Finnegans wake: "a semitary of somnionia" --
Bertolt Brecht: in praise of plagiarism.
Series Title: Oklahoma project for discourse and theory, v. 13.
Responsibility: by Claudette Sartiliot.

Abstract:

This is the first modern study of the phenomenon of quotation, about which very little has been written in English. Until the end of the nineteenth century, or at least until Flaubert, most writers relied on the traditional definition of quotation derived from classical rhetoric, employing citations as ornaments or illustrations. Claudette Sartiliot argues that for modernist and postmodernist writers quotation represents a definite break with the tradition as well as a means of questioning the nature of the literary text. Using many specific examples from Jacques Derrida's Glas, Joyce's Finnegans Wake, and several works by Bertolt Brecht, Sartiliot demonstrates different aspects of quotation in modernist and postmodernist literature. In essence, citation in these texts acts as a kind of indeterminate point of contact between the author's discourse and traditional discourses. Sartiliot's approach allows her to discuss a wide range of interrelated issues surrounding modernist or postmodernist texts, as well as to explore the consequences of the break with classical quotation in three different genres: philosophy, fiction, and the theater.

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