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Citizenship law in Africa : a comparative study

Author: Bronwen ManbyOpen Society Foundations.Open Society FoundationOpen Society Institute.AfriMAP.All authors
Publisher: New York, NY : Open Society Foundations, Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy (AfriMAP), Open Society Justice Initiative, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Few African countries provide for an explicit right to a nationality. Laws and practices governing citizenship leave hundreds of thousands of people in Africa without a country to which they belong. Statelessness and discriminatory citizenship practices underlie and exacerbate tensions in many regions of the continent, according to this report by the Open Society Institute. Citizenship Law in Africa is a  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Manby, Bronwen.
Citizenship law in Africa.
New York, NY : Open Society Foundations, Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy (AfriMAP), Open Society Justice Initiative, c2010
(OCoLC)811841070
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Bronwen Manby; Open Society Foundations.; Open Society Foundation; Open Society Institute.; AfriMAP.; Open Society Justice Initiative.
ISBN: 9781920489588 1920489584
OCLC Number: 682951765
Notes: Title from PDF title page (Soros, viewed November 22, 2010).
Description: 120 pages
Contents: Sources and acknowledgments --
Disclaimer --
Abbreviations --
Definitions --
Summary --
African citizenship law --
Racial, ethnic, and religious discrimination --
Gender discrimination --
Naturalisation --
Dual citizenship --
Due process: Revocation of citizenship and expulsion of citizens --
International norms --
Recommendations --
International norms on citizenship --
The right to a nationality --
State succession and citizenship --
Discrimination and arbitrary deprivation of citizenship --
Due process in relation to expulsion --
The jurisprudence of the African Commission on Human and People's Rights --
Citizenship under colonial rule --
The basis of citizenship law today --
Right to a nationality --
Citizenship by descent --
Racial and ethnic discrimination --
Gender discrimination --
Botswana: The Unity Dow Citizenship Case --
Reforms in North Africa --
Ethiopia: The constitution and law are gender neutral, but practice is not --
Proof of nationality --
Supreme Court rules on proof of nationality in DRC --
Dual citizenship --
A change of mind on dual citizenship in East Africa --
Citizenship by naturalisation --
Citizenship requirements for public office --
Egypt: Dual citizenship and political rights --
Rights for the African diaspora --
Ethiopia --
Ghana --
Loss and deprivation of citizenship --
Right to identity documents and passports --
Egypt recognises the right of adherents of "non-recognised" religions to documentation --
Citizenship as a "durable solution" for refugees --
Appendix: Legal sources --
Index --
List of tables --
Table 1: Countries providing a right to a nationality --
Table 2: Right to citizenship by descent --
Table 3: Right to pass citizenship to a spouse --
Table 4: Countries permitting and prohibiting dual citizenship for adults --
Table 5: Right to acquire citizenship as an adult by naturalisation or registration/declaration --
Table 6: Criteria for loss of citizenship.
Responsibility: by Bronwen Manby.

Abstract:

Few African countries provide for an explicit right to a nationality. Laws and practices governing citizenship leave hundreds of thousands of people in Africa without a country to which they belong. Statelessness and discriminatory citizenship practices underlie and exacerbate tensions in many regions of the continent, according to this report by the Open Society Institute. Citizenship Law in Africa is a comparative study by the Open Society Justice Initiative and Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy Project. It describes the often arbitrary, discriminatory, and contradictory citizenship laws that exist from state to state, and recommends ways that African countries can bring their citizenship laws in line with international legal norms. The report covers topics such as citizenship by descent, citizenship by naturalization, gender discrimination in citizenship law, dual citizenship, and the right to identity documents and passports. It describes how stateless Africans are systematically exposed to human rights abuses: they can neither vote nor stand for public office; they cannot enroll their children in school, travel freely, or own property; they cannot work for the government.--Publisher description.

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