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City boys : Cagney, Bogart, Garfield

Author: Robert Sklar
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Beginning with The Public Enemy, produced by Warner Bros. in 1931, James Cagney established a new cultural type on the American screen and in the world's imagination. That "type," later developed by Humphrey Bogart and John Garfield, was the urban tough guy - small, wiry, savvy, and street-smart. Often presented as a gangster, newspaper reporter, or private eye, the "city boy" seemed the quintessential product of
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: James Cagney; Humphrey Bogart; John Garfield; James Cagney; Humphrey Bogart; John Garfield; James Cagney; Humphrey Bogart; John Garfield; James Cagney; Humphrey Bogart; John Garfield; James Cagney; Humphrey Bogart; John Garfield; Humphrey Bogart; James Cagney; John Garfield
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Sklar
ISBN: 0691047952 9780691047959
OCLC Number: 24318057
Description: xiii, 311 p., [22] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: pt. I. City Boys Go National. 1. A Society of Ragamuffins. 2. Roughneck Sissy and Charming Boy. 3. The Private Enemy --
pt. II. City Boys as Hollywood Types. 4. Baby Face. 5. The Studio Labyrinth. 6. Pushcarts and Patriotism --
pt. III. City Boys in War and Cold War. 7. Heroes without Uniforms. 8. Ordinary Guys and Private Eyes. 9. American Dopes --
pt. IV. City Boys Grow Older. 10. A Street Boy's Honor. 11. He Didn't Stand Still. 12. Top of the World.
Responsibility: Robert Sklar.
More information:

Abstract:

Beginning with The Public Enemy, produced by Warner Bros. in 1931, James Cagney established a new cultural type on the American screen and in the world's imagination. That "type," later developed by Humphrey Bogart and John Garfield, was the urban tough guy - small, wiry, savvy, and street-smart. Often presented as a gangster, newspaper reporter, or private eye, the "city boy" seemed the quintessential product of urban America, although he was more a model for his.

Audience than a mirror of social actuality. While blending the stories of the professional and political lives of Cagney, Bogart, and Garfield into one fascinating narrative, Robert Sklar probes the cultural forces that produced this vivid cultural icon and examines its power over masculine self-definition. Cagney and Bogart, whose legends have grown over time, and Garfield, whose work has been unfortunately neglected, are portrayed here in relation not only to their.

Films and their screen personas but also to their working environment. Sklar gives a real sense of the intensity with which each of them struggled to control his own work in the face of the power of Warner Bros., whose effort to produce socially conscious movies did not prevent the company from exploiting its stars. The book also describes the involvement of the three stars with political causes and their response to attacks mounted by powerful right-wing elements.

Against "leftists" in the entertainment industry. Moving beyond conventional film criticism, which has largely ignored the importance of performance, City Boys reveals the inseparability of actors' professional lives, American societal struggles, and media representations.

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Linked Data


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