skip to content
Civilising criminal justice : an international restorative agenda for penal reform Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Civilising criminal justice : an international restorative agenda for penal reform

Author: David J Cornwell; John R Blad; Martin Wright
Publisher: Sherfield-on-Loddon, Hook : Waterside Press, [2013]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"A magnificent collection, Civilising Criminal Justice is an inescapable resource for anyone interested in restorative justice: truly international and packed with experience while combining history, theory, developments and practical advice. This volume of specially commissioned contributions by widely respected commentators on crime and punishment from various countries is a 'break-through' in bringing together  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David J Cornwell; John R Blad; Martin Wright
ISBN: 9781904380047 1904380042
OCLC Number: 859591507
Description: 565 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Civilising Procedure --
1. Justice and Punishment: Myths, Mercy and Anglo-Saxon Attitudes --
David Cornwell --
Setting the Scene --
An Historical Overview --
Penal Mythology: Fantasy and Folklore --
Justice Systems' --
Bifurcation --
Decarceration --
Mercy: Means and Ends Within Civilised Justice --
Penal Reform and Anglo-Saxon Attitudes --
Conclusion: Does the Restorative Ethic Have a Future? --
References --
2. Restorative Justice as a Procedural Revolution: Some Lessons from the Adversary System --
F.W.M. (Fred) McElrea --
Introduction --
Restorative Justice as a Procedural Revolution --
Historical Overview --
An Overview of Adversarial and Restorative Processes --
Some Final Thoughts --
References --
Case --
3. Retribution and/or Restoration? The Purpose of our Justice System through the Lens of Judges and Prosecutors --
Borbala Fellegi --
Introduction --
The Methodology and Sample of Research. Contents note continued: The Opinions of Legal Practitioners on Mediation --
Conclusions --
References --
4. Crime and Justice: A Shift in Perspective --
Louis Blom-Cooper --
Preamble --
Models of Criminal Trial --
Criminal Proceedings --
Victims of Crime --
An Alternative Strategy --
Concluding Observations --
References --
Cases --
5. Civilising Civil Justice --
Ann Skelton --
Introduction --
Legal Pluralism Reveals Other Ways of Doing Justice --
A Call for the Recognition of RJ in Defamation Suits is Answered --
Conclusion --
References --
Cases --
6. Seriousness: A Disproportionate Construction and Application? --
Christine Piper and Susan Easton --
Introduction --
Calculating Culpability and Harm --
Establishing Aggravation --
Previous Convictions --
Other Justifications? --
Conclusion --
References --
Cases --
pt. 2 Civilising Theory --
7. Civilisation of Criminal Justice: Restorative Justice Amongst other Strategies --
John Blad --
Introduction. Contents note continued: Criminal Justice and Civilisation --
Penal Instrumentalism --
Conditions and Expressions of Harshness --
Restorative Justice and Other Strategies of Civilisation --
The Strategic Value of Agreements --
References --
8. Tempering Justice with Compassion: Rationales of Personal Mitigation in Sentencing --
Bas van Stokkom --
Introduction --
Just Deserts and Personal Mitigation: Theory Versus Practice --
Beyond Just Deserts Reductionism: Tasioulas' Theory --
Personal Factors and Leniency: Criticism and Contra-criticism --
Facilitating Responsibility --
Rationales of Personal Mitigation --
Conclusions --
References --
9. To Punish or to Restore? A False Alternative --
Serge Gutwirth and Paul De Hert --
Introduction --
Restorativism Instead of Law --
Restorativism Alongside Law --
Conclusion --
References --
10. Dialogical Justice: Philosophical Considerations for Re-thinking the Reaction to Crime in a Restorative Way --
Federico Reggio. Contents note continued: Viewing Restorative Justice from a Philosophical Perspective --
The Foundations' of the Paradigm: Restorative Justice and the Challenge of Ethics --
Orienting RJ: Beyond Modernity and Postmodernity --
The Risk of Undermining Restorative Justice: An Example --
Beyond Dogmatism and Scepticism --
Is There a Third Way? Suggestions from the Past --
The Indigence of Truth' and the Dialogical Principle' --
Implications of the Dialogical Principle for the Theory and Practice of Criminal Justice --
Restorative Justice and the Challenge of Complexity --
References --
11. From Civilising Punishment to Civilising Criminal Justice: From Punishment to Restoration --
Lode Walgrave --
Preserving a Criminal Justice System --
Making Criminal Justice More Civilised --
Restorative Justice --
Conclusion --
References --
pt. 3 Civilising Practice --
12. Could a Restorative System of Justice be more Civilised than a Punitive One? --
Martin Wright --
Introduction. Contents note continued: Assumptions on Which the System is Based --
Punishment and Sentencing --
Two Paradigms --
Would Restorative Justice be More Civilised? --
Discussion --
Conclusion and Outlook --
References --
13. Beyond Restorative Justice to Restorative Practice --
Thomas Trenczek --
Crime as Conflict --
Justice as Fairness ---
Justice as Participation --
Mediation in Criminal Conflicts and in Civil Disputes ---
A Community Justice Orientation --
Restorative Justice Goes Further --
References --
14. Restorative Justice and Penal Mediation: The French Exception --
J-P Bonafe-Schmitt --
Introduction --
Context of the Development of Restorative Justice in France --
Differences in Matters of Restorative Justice --
Difficulties in the Development of Restorative Justice in France --
Conclusions --
References --
15. Positioning the Offender in a Restorative Framework: Potential Dialogues and Forced Conversations --
Claire Spivakovsky --
Introduction. Contents note continued: pt. 1 The position of the Adult Offender in Contemporary Literature and Practice --
pt. 2 Adult Offender Populations that are Exceptions and Therefore Have Been Met with Restorative Justice Approaches --
Observations and Conclusions --
References --
16. Development of Restorative Justice Practices in Norway --
Per Andersen --
Introduction --
RJPs are Connected to the Criminal Justice System (in Norway) --
Organizing RJP in Norway --
A State Service --
RJP and CJS --
Future Perspectives --
Characteristics of the Criminal Justice System --
RJ Limitations or Dilemmas --
References --
17. Downsizing the Use of Imprisonment in Finland --
Tapio Lappi-Seppala --
Introduction --
The Decline of Imprisonment in Finland --
Causes and Consequences: Explaining Penal Liberalisation --
The Role of Restorative Justice ---
Mediation --
Conclusion --
References --
18. Conclusions --
David Cornwell, John Blad and Martin Wright.
Responsibility: edited by David Cornwell, John Blad and Martin Wright ; with a foreword by John Braithwaite.

Abstract:

A magnificent collection, Civilising Criminal Justice is an inescapable resource for anyone interested in restorative justice: truly international and packed with experience while combining history,  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

'Eighteen original contributions... steer restorative justice into critical territory. In the process, they make a very good effort at examining the ability of restorative justice to challenge Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(5)

User lists with this item (2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/859591507> # Civilising criminal justice : an international restorative agenda for penal reform
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
    library:oclcnum "859591507" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/enk> ;
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1077326> ; # Prisons
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1084107> ; # Punishment
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/364.6/e23/> ;
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1096003> ; # Restorative justice
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/880260> ; # Corrections
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/883246> ; # Criminal justice, Administration of
    schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
    schema:datePublished "2013" ;
    schema:description ""A magnificent collection, Civilising Criminal Justice is an inescapable resource for anyone interested in restorative justice: truly international and packed with experience while combining history, theory, developments and practical advice. This volume of specially commissioned contributions by widely respected commentators on crime and punishment from various countries is a 'break-through' in bringing together some of the best arguments for long-overdue penal reform. An increasingly urgent need to change outmoded criminal processes, even in advanced democracies, demands an end to those penal excesses driven by political expediency and damaging notions of retribution, deterrence and punishment for its own sake. 'Civilising' criminal justice will make it fairer, more consistent, understandable and considerate towards victims of crime, currently largely excluded from participation. Principles of reparative and restorative justice have become increasingly influential in the quest to provide justice which tackles harm, compensates victims, repairs relationships, resolves debilitating conflicts and calls offenders to account. And in any case, what real justification is there for subjecting more and more people to the expensive but hollow experience of prison, especially at a time of economic stringency. Civil justice - in its various forms - can be swifter, cheaper and more effective, in court or through mediated processes focusing on the harmful consequences of offences rather than inflicting punishment that may satisfy a baying media but come home to haunt the community. This brave and generous book illustrates the many different ways in which criminal justice can be 'civilised' and how lessons can be learned from practical experience across the world and shared expertise. It is a volume that every politician should read, every criminal justice professional should possess, and that every student of criminology and penology will find invaluable."--Publisher's website."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Viewing Restorative Justice from a Philosophical Perspective -- The Foundations' of the Paradigm: Restorative Justice and the Challenge of Ethics -- Orienting RJ: Beyond Modernity and Postmodernity -- The Risk of Undermining Restorative Justice: An Example -- Beyond Dogmatism and Scepticism -- Is There a Third Way? Suggestions from the Past -- The Indigence of Truth' and the Dialogical Principle' -- Implications of the Dialogical Principle for the Theory and Practice of Criminal Justice -- Restorative Justice and the Challenge of Complexity -- References -- 11. From Civilising Punishment to Civilising Criminal Justice: From Punishment to Restoration -- Lode Walgrave -- Preserving a Criminal Justice System -- Making Criminal Justice More Civilised -- Restorative Justice -- Conclusion -- References -- pt. 3 Civilising Practice -- 12. Could a Restorative System of Justice be more Civilised than a Punitive One? -- Martin Wright -- Introduction."@en ;
    schema:description "Machine generated contents note: pt. 1 Civilising Procedure -- 1. Justice and Punishment: Myths, Mercy and Anglo-Saxon Attitudes -- David Cornwell -- Setting the Scene -- An Historical Overview -- Penal Mythology: Fantasy and Folklore -- Justice Systems' -- Bifurcation -- Decarceration -- Mercy: Means and Ends Within Civilised Justice -- Penal Reform and Anglo-Saxon Attitudes -- Conclusion: Does the Restorative Ethic Have a Future? -- References -- 2. Restorative Justice as a Procedural Revolution: Some Lessons from the Adversary System -- F.W.M. (Fred) McElrea -- Introduction -- Restorative Justice as a Procedural Revolution -- Historical Overview -- An Overview of Adversarial and Restorative Processes -- Some Final Thoughts -- References -- Case -- 3. Retribution and/or Restoration? The Purpose of our Justice System through the Lens of Judges and Prosecutors -- Borbala Fellegi -- Introduction -- The Methodology and Sample of Research."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: pt. 1 The position of the Adult Offender in Contemporary Literature and Practice -- pt. 2 Adult Offender Populations that are Exceptions and Therefore Have Been Met with Restorative Justice Approaches -- Observations and Conclusions -- References -- 16. Development of Restorative Justice Practices in Norway -- Per Andersen -- Introduction -- RJPs are Connected to the Criminal Justice System (in Norway) -- Organizing RJP in Norway -- A State Service -- RJP and CJS -- Future Perspectives -- Characteristics of the Criminal Justice System -- RJ Limitations or Dilemmas -- References -- 17. Downsizing the Use of Imprisonment in Finland -- Tapio Lappi-Seppala -- Introduction -- The Decline of Imprisonment in Finland -- Causes and Consequences: Explaining Penal Liberalisation -- The Role of Restorative Justice --- Mediation -- Conclusion -- References -- 18. Conclusions -- David Cornwell, John Blad and Martin Wright."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: The Opinions of Legal Practitioners on Mediation -- Conclusions -- References -- 4. Crime and Justice: A Shift in Perspective -- Louis Blom-Cooper -- Preamble -- Models of Criminal Trial -- Criminal Proceedings -- Victims of Crime -- An Alternative Strategy -- Concluding Observations -- References -- Cases -- 5. Civilising Civil Justice -- Ann Skelton -- Introduction -- Legal Pluralism Reveals Other Ways of Doing Justice -- A Call for the Recognition of RJ in Defamation Suits is Answered -- Conclusion -- References -- Cases -- 6. Seriousness: A Disproportionate Construction and Application? -- Christine Piper and Susan Easton -- Introduction -- Calculating Culpability and Harm -- Establishing Aggravation -- Previous Convictions -- Other Justifications? -- Conclusion -- References -- Cases -- pt. 2 Civilising Theory -- 7. Civilisation of Criminal Justice: Restorative Justice Amongst other Strategies -- John Blad -- Introduction."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Assumptions on Which the System is Based -- Punishment and Sentencing -- Two Paradigms -- Would Restorative Justice be More Civilised? -- Discussion -- Conclusion and Outlook -- References -- 13. Beyond Restorative Justice to Restorative Practice -- Thomas Trenczek -- Crime as Conflict -- Justice as Fairness --- Justice as Participation -- Mediation in Criminal Conflicts and in Civil Disputes --- A Community Justice Orientation -- Restorative Justice Goes Further -- References -- 14. Restorative Justice and Penal Mediation: The French Exception -- J-P Bonafe-Schmitt -- Introduction -- Context of the Development of Restorative Justice in France -- Differences in Matters of Restorative Justice -- Difficulties in the Development of Restorative Justice in France -- Conclusions -- References -- 15. Positioning the Offender in a Restorative Framework: Potential Dialogues and Forced Conversations -- Claire Spivakovsky -- Introduction."@en ;
    schema:description "Contents note continued: Criminal Justice and Civilisation -- Penal Instrumentalism -- Conditions and Expressions of Harshness -- Restorative Justice and Other Strategies of Civilisation -- The Strategic Value of Agreements -- References -- 8. Tempering Justice with Compassion: Rationales of Personal Mitigation in Sentencing -- Bas van Stokkom -- Introduction -- Just Deserts and Personal Mitigation: Theory Versus Practice -- Beyond Just Deserts Reductionism: Tasioulas' Theory -- Personal Factors and Leniency: Criticism and Contra-criticism -- Facilitating Responsibility -- Rationales of Personal Mitigation -- Conclusions -- References -- 9. To Punish or to Restore? A False Alternative -- Serge Gutwirth and Paul De Hert -- Introduction -- Restorativism Instead of Law -- Restorativism Alongside Law -- Conclusion -- References -- 10. Dialogical Justice: Philosophical Considerations for Re-thinking the Reaction to Crime in a Restorative Way -- Federico Reggio."@en ;
    schema:editor <http://viaf.org/viaf/171159575> ; # John R. Blad
    schema:editor <http://viaf.org/viaf/70818236> ; # David J. Cornwell
    schema:editor <http://viaf.org/viaf/94847982> ; # Martin Wright
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1405466983> ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:name "Civilising criminal justice : an international restorative agenda for penal reform"@en ;
    schema:productID "859591507" ;
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781904380047> ;
    umbel:isLike <http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GBB543338> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/859591507> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1077326> # Prisons
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Prisons"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1084107> # Punishment
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Punishment"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1096003> # Restorative justice
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Restorative justice"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/880260> # Corrections
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Corrections"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/883246> # Criminal justice, Administration of
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Criminal justice, Administration of"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/171159575> # John R. Blad
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Blad" ;
    schema:givenName "John R." ;
    schema:name "John R. Blad" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/70818236> # David J. Cornwell
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Cornwell" ;
    schema:givenName "David J." ;
    schema:name "David J. Cornwell" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/94847982> # Martin Wright
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Wright" ;
    schema:givenName "Martin" ;
    schema:name "Martin Wright" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9781904380047>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:isbn "1904380042" ;
    schema:isbn "9781904380047" ;
    .

<http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/859591507>
    a genont:InformationResource, genont:ContentTypeGenericResource ;
    schema:about <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/859591507> ; # Civilising criminal justice : an international restorative agenda for penal reform
    schema:dateModified "2018-11-08" ;
    void:inDataset <http://purl.oclc.org/dataset/WorldCat> ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.