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The Civitas anthology of African American slave narratives

Auteur : William L Andrews; Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
Éditeur : Washington, D.C. : Civitas/Counterpoint, ©1999.
Édition/format :   Livre : Biographie : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et tous les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
Hailed in 1849 as "a new department in the literature of civilization," the slave narrative forms the foundation of the African American literary tradition. From the late eighteenth-century narratives by Africans who endured the harrowing Middle Passage, through the classic American fugitive slave narratives of the mid-nineteenth century, slave narratives have provided some of the most graphic and damning  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Biography
Biographies
Format – détails additionnels : Online version:
Civitas anthology of African American slave narratives.
Washington, D.C. : Civitas/Counterpoint, ©1999
(OCoLC)607139758
Online version:
Civitas anthology of African American slave narratives.
Washington, D.C. : Civitas/Counterpoint, ©1999
(OCoLC)632241279
Type d’ouvrage : Biographie
Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : William L Andrews; Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
ISBN : 1582430195 9781582430195
Numéro OCLC : 40193760
Description : xi, 642 pages ; 24 cm
Contenu : The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian slave, related by herself, to which is added, the narrative of Asa-Asa, a captured African (1831) --
The Confessions of Nat Turner, the leader of the late insurrection in Southampton, Va., as fully and voluntarily made to Thomas R. Gray (1831) --
Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave, written by himself (1845) --
Narrative of William W. Brown, an American slave, written by himself (1849) --
Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American slave, written by himself (1849) --
Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, or, The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from slavery (1860) --
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, written by herself, Harriet A. Jacobs (1861).
Responsabilité : edited by William L. Andrews, Henry Louis Gates Jr.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

Hailed in 1849 as "a new department in the literature of civilization," the slave narrative forms the foundation of the African American literary tradition. From the late eighteenth-century narratives by Africans who endured the harrowing Middle Passage, through the classic American fugitive slave narratives of the mid-nineteenth century, slave narratives have provided some of the most graphic and damning documentary evidence of the horrors of slavery. The slave narrative blends personal memory and rhetorical attacks on slavery to create powerful literature and propaganda. This work presents the seven classic antislavery narratives of the antebellum period in their entirety: The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave, the first slave narrative published by a woman in the Americas; The Confessions of Nat Turner, written when Turner was asked to record his motivation for leading the bloodiest slave revolt in U.S. history; The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the first narrative to fashion the male fugitive slave into an African American cultural hero; The Narrative of William W. Brown, an account that explored with unprecedented realism the slave's survival ethic and the art of the slave trickster; The Narrative of the Life of Henry Bibb, the story of the struggles of the most memorable family man among the classic slave narrators; Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, a chronicle of one of the most daring and celebrated slave escapes ever recorded; and Incidents in the Life of Slave Girl, a dramatic text that exposed the sexual abuse of female slaves and pioneered the image of the fugitive slave woman as an articulate resister and survivor. Born out of lives of unparalleled suffering, the slave narrative captures all the bravery, drama, and hope that characterized the African American struggle against slavery.

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Données liées


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