skip to content
Classical taste in America 1800-1840 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Classical taste in America 1800-1840

Author: Wendy A Cooper; Baltimore Museum of Art.; Mint Museum (Charlotte, N.C.); Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Baltimore Museum of Art ; New York : Abbeville Press, ©1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
During the first four decades of the last century, America was mesmerized by the classical world. And never before has a book so thoroughly examined the period's diversity of thought and material production to demonstrate the variety of ways that nineteenth-century Americans used, misused, and even abused the lessons of antiquity in the arts and decorative arts. To an extraordinary extent, Americans embraced
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Exhibition catalogs
Exhibitions
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Cooper, Wendy A.
Classical taste in America 1800-1840.
Baltimore, Md. : Baltimore Museum of Art ; New York : Abbeville Press, c1993
(OCoLC)623688787
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Wendy A Cooper; Baltimore Museum of Art.; Mint Museum (Charlotte, N.C.); Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.
ISBN: 1558593853 9781558593855 9781558595446 1558595449
OCLC Number: 27728184
Notes: "The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland, June 27-September 26, 1993; Mint Museum of Art, Charlotte, North Carolina, November 20, 1993-March 13, 1994; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Houston, Texas, May 1-July 24, 1994"--T.p. verso.
Description: 308 : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
Contents: 1. Sources of inspiration: the European influence --
2. Proper amusements of the virtuous: public and private collecting --
3. From the stores of antiquity: furniture and furnishings --
4. Machines introduce muses to the masses: the popular dissemination --
5. American heroes: classical style: public and domestic virtue.
Responsibility: Wendy A. Cooper.

Abstract:

During the first four decades of the last century, America was mesmerized by the classical world. And never before has a book so thoroughly examined the period's diversity of thought and material production to demonstrate the variety of ways that nineteenth-century Americans used, misused, and even abused the lessons of antiquity in the arts and decorative arts. To an extraordinary extent, Americans embraced classicism at the beginning of the nineteenth century both as a.

fashionable new international style, which had its European beginnings in the eighteenth-century excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum, and as a distinctive expression of America's own emulation of classical precedents in government, ideal beauty, education, and the decorative arts. This book charmingly investigates the multifaceted impact of classical political, intellectual, and aesthetic values on early nineteenth-century American culture through a close examination.

of approximately 225 representative objects from this aesthetically brilliant period, including paintings, sculpture, furniture, silver, glass, ceramics, textiles, and printed materials. Focusing particularly on the type of objects with which Americans decorated and furnished their homes, this book examines not only the superbly designed and fashioned products made for the well-to-do, but also those objects that were mass-produced and more widely sought by a burgeoning.

middle class. From elegant Grecian couches with Roman paw feet, to diminutive pressed glass salts ornamented with classical chariots and cornucopia, few aspects of American material life escaped the classical craze. The text of this fascinating volume delves into the symbolic and material significance of classicism in American life, the adaptation antique forms and motifs by American craftsmen and consumers, and the vernacularization of classicism. The material.

production of this lavish and visually exciting period provides an illuminating look at the lives and homes of a wide range of Americans in the early days of our republic.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/27728184>
library:oclcnum"27728184"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/27728184>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1993"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1993"
schema:description"fashionable new international style, which had its European beginnings in the eighteenth-century excavations at Pompeii and Herculaneum, and as a distinctive expression of America's own emulation of classical precedents in government, ideal beauty, education, and the decorative arts. This book charmingly investigates the multifaceted impact of classical political, intellectual, and aesthetic values on early nineteenth-century American culture through a close examination."@en
schema:description"During the first four decades of the last century, America was mesmerized by the classical world. And never before has a book so thoroughly examined the period's diversity of thought and material production to demonstrate the variety of ways that nineteenth-century Americans used, misused, and even abused the lessons of antiquity in the arts and decorative arts. To an extraordinary extent, Americans embraced classicism at the beginning of the nineteenth century both as a."@en
schema:description"production of this lavish and visually exciting period provides an illuminating look at the lives and homes of a wide range of Americans in the early days of our republic."@en
schema:description"1. Sources of inspiration: the European influence -- 2. Proper amusements of the virtuous: public and private collecting -- 3. From the stores of antiquity: furniture and furnishings -- 4. Machines introduce muses to the masses: the popular dissemination -- 5. American heroes: classical style: public and domestic virtue."@en
schema:description"middle class. From elegant Grecian couches with Roman paw feet, to diminutive pressed glass salts ornamented with classical chariots and cornucopia, few aspects of American material life escaped the classical craze. The text of this fascinating volume delves into the symbolic and material significance of classicism in American life, the adaptation antique forms and motifs by American craftsmen and consumers, and the vernacularization of classicism. The material."@en
schema:description"of approximately 225 representative objects from this aesthetically brilliant period, including paintings, sculpture, furniture, silver, glass, ceramics, textiles, and printed materials. Focusing particularly on the type of objects with which Americans decorated and furnished their homes, this book examines not only the superbly designed and fashioned products made for the well-to-do, but also those objects that were mass-produced and more widely sought by a burgeoning."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/479471273>
schema:genre"Exhibition catalogs"@en
schema:genre"Exhibition catalogs."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Classical taste in America 1800-1840"@en
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.