skip to content
Climbing mount improbable Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Climbing mount improbable

Author: Richard Dawkins
Publisher: New York : Norton, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st American edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
How do species evolve? Richard Dawkins, one of the world's most eminent zoologists, likens the process to scaling a huge, Himalaya-size peak, the Mount Improbable of his title. An alpinist does not leap from sea level to the summit; neither does a species utterly change forms overnight, but instead follows a course of "slow, cumulative, one-step-at-a-time, non-random survival of random variants"--a course that  Read more...
Rating:

based on 1 rating(s) 1 with a review

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Dawkins
ISBN: 0393039307 9780393039306
OCLC Number: 34633422
Description: xii, 340 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Facing Mount Rushmore --
Silken fetters --
Message from the mountain --
Getting off the ground --
Forty-fold path to enlightenment --
Museum of all shells - Kaleidoscopic embryos --
Pollen grains and magic bullets --
Robot repeater --
'A garden inclosed'.
Responsibility: Richard Dawkins ; original drawings by Lalla Ward.

Abstract:

How do species evolve? Richard Dawkins, one of the world's most eminent zoologists, likens the process to scaling a huge, Himalaya-size peak, the Mount Improbable of his title. An alpinist does not leap from sea level to the summit; neither does a species utterly change forms overnight, but instead follows a course of "slow, cumulative, one-step-at-a-time, non-random survival of random variants"--a course that Charles Darwin, Dawkins's great hero, called natural selection. Illustrating his arguments with case studies from the natural world, such as the evolution of the eye and the lung, and the coevolution of certain kinds of figs and wasps, Dawkins provides a vigorous, entertaining defense of key Darwinian ideas.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

WorldCat User Reviews (1)

Good popular work. On the simple end of popularizations

by vleighton (WorldCat user published 2012-01-08) Good Permalink

Written for the general public, this work on evolutionary theory attempts to show how dramatic functional complexity can evolve gradually. The overall metaphor is that there can be gentle slopes leading up the backside of a slope that on its face has a steep cliff. We see the steep cliff of complexity...
Read more...  Read more...

  • Was this review helpful to you?
  •   
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (1)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/34633422>
library:oclcnum"34633422"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/34633422>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Ontwikkelingsbiologie."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:bookEdition"1st American ed."
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"How do species evolve? Richard Dawkins, one of the world's most eminent zoologists, likens the process to scaling a huge, Himalaya-size peak, the Mount Improbable of his title. An alpinist does not leap from sea level to the summit; neither does a species utterly change forms overnight, but instead follows a course of "slow, cumulative, one-step-at-a-time, non-random survival of random variants"--a course that Charles Darwin, Dawkins's great hero, called natural selection. Illustrating his arguments with case studies from the natural world, such as the evolution of the eye and the lung, and the coevolution of certain kinds of figs and wasps, Dawkins provides a vigorous, entertaining defense of key Darwinian ideas."
schema:description"Facing Mount Rushmore -- Silken fetters -- Message from the mountain -- Getting off the ground -- Forty-fold path to enlightenment -- Museum of all shells - Kaleidoscopic embryos -- Pollen grains and magic bullets -- Robot repeater -- 'A garden inclosed'."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/537412>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Climbing mount improbable"
schema:numberOfPages"340"
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.