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The collected essays of John Peale Bishop;

Author: John Peale Bishop; Edmund Wilson
Publisher: New York, C. Scribner's Sons, 1948.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bishop, John Peale, 1892-1944.
Collected essays of John Peale Bishop.
New York, C. Scribner's Sons, 1948
(OCoLC)576497308
Named Person: Edmund Wilson; Edmund Wilson
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Peale Bishop; Edmund Wilson
OCLC Number: 6417415
Description: xviii, 508 pages portrait 22 cm
Contents: The South and tradition --
The Infanta's ribbon --
The Golden Bough --
Homage to Hemingway --
Moll Flanders' way --
The strange case of Vardis Fisher --
The missing all --
Living Homer begged his bread --
The poems and prose of E.E. Cummings --
The discipline of poetry --
The poetry of John Masefield --
Matthew Arnold : struggle and flight --
The myth and modern literature --
The sorrows of Thomas Wolfe --
The poetry of A.E. Housman --
Finnegans wake --
The arts in America --
Poetry and painting --
The painter and the dynamo : Fernand Léger --
The passion of Pablo Picasso --
Manet and the middle class --
The movies as an art : The last laugh --
Sex appeal in the movies --
A film of Jean Cocteau --
Three brilliant young novelists (The beautiful and damned by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The beginning of wisdom by Stephen Vincent Benét, Three soldiers by John Dos Passos) --
The distrust of ideas (D.H. Lawrence and Sherwood Anderson) --
The modernism of Mr Cabell --
Incorrect English (The enormous room by E.E. Cummings) --
Lilies that fester (Young people's pride by Stephen Vincent Benét) --
John O'Hara --
War and no peace (Gone with the wind by Margaret Mitchell) --
Vanity fair (In their own image by Hamilton Basso) --
The death of an order (The fathers by Allen Tate) --
The violent country (The robber bridegroom by Eudora Welty) --
The intelligence of poets (Collected poems by A.E. Robinson, The open sea by Edgar Lee Masters, Poems 1918-21 by Ezra Pound) --
Poets in prose (Memoirs of a midget by Walter de la Mare, Rosinante to the road again by John Dos Passos) --
Introducing irony by Maxwell Bodenheim --
On translating Dante (The inferno of Dane translated by Lucy Lockert, The divine comedy of Dante Alighieri translated by Jefferson Butler Fletcher --
The social muse once more (Invocation to the social muse by Archibald MacLeish) --
Final dreading (The assassins by Frederic Prokosch) --
A little legacy (Reading the spirit by Richard Eberhart) --
The poems of Ford Madox Ford (Collected poems by Ford Madox Ford) --
A diversity of opinions (Conversations at midnight by Enda St. Vincent Millay) --
The federal poets' number of Poetry --
The midnight of sense (First will and testament by Kenneth Patchen) --
The poetry of Mark Van Doren (Collected poems 1922-1938 by Mark Van Doren) --
Chainpoems and surrealism, 1940 --
The muse at the microphone (Air raid : a verse play for radio and America was promises by Archibald MacLeish) --
The unconstraining voice (Another time by W.H. Auden) --
The Hamlet of L. MacNeice (Autumn journal by Louis MacNeice) --
Spirit and sense (This is our own by Marie De L. Welch, A turning wind by Muriel Rukeyser, Song in the meadow by Elizabeth Madox Roberts) --
Portrait in paper (One part love by Babette Deutsch) --
The poet as an American (West walking Yankee by Henry Chapin, Poems and portraits by Christopher LaFarge, Collected poems of Kenneth Fearing) --
A Catholic poet (Weep and prepare by Raymond E.F. Larsson) --
Musician as poet (The gap of brightness by F.R. Higgens) --
Impassioned niceness (Pattern of a day by Robert Hillyer) --
Shafts of speech (Make bright the arrows by Edna St. Vincent Millay) --
The talk of Ezra Pound (Cantos LII-LXXI by Ezra Pound) --
A Georgian poet (Poems 1930-1940 by Edmund Blunden) --
England and poetry (Poetry and the modern world by David Daiches) --
On translating poets (Three Spanish American poets translated by Lloyd Mallan, Mary and C.V. Wicker and Joseph Leonard Grucci) --
The caged sybil (New poems, 1943 : An anthology of British and American verse edited by Oscar Williams) --
A humanistic critic (Men seen by Paul Rosenfeld) --
Answers to a questionnaire --
Matthew Arnold again (Matthew Arnold by Lionel Trilling) --
A romantic genius (Audubon's America edited by Donal Curlross Peattie --
Georges Simenon --
Poetry is an art --
Classicism without a toga --
Diction --
The subject --
Obscurity --
Time and art --
English and American style --
Some influences in modern literature --
Princeton --
Rhapsody over a coffee cup (Vienna) --
New Orleans : Decatur Street --
Mr. Rockefeller's other city (Williamsburg) --
Newport and the robber baronesses --
Fall River : Mill Town --
World's Fair notes --
The South revisited --
West Virginia --
Cape Cod --
Prophyrio : a Rococo comedy --
How Brakespeare fell in love with a lady who had been dead some time --
Toadstools are poison --
An aristocrat.
Responsibility: ed. with an introd. by Edmund Wilson.

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