skip to content
Collected poems Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Collected poems

Author: Countee Cullen; Major Jackson
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Library of America, ©2013.
Series: American poets project, 32.
Edition/Format:   Book : Poetry : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A major and sometimes controversial figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Countee Cullen fused a mastery of the formal lyric with a passionate engagement with themes social, religious, racial, and personal in such books as Color, Copper Sun, and The Black Christ. Certain of his poems-- "Heritage," "Yet Do I Marvel"--Are widely celebrated, but much of Cullen's work remains to be discovered. This volume restores to print  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Poetry
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Countee Cullen; Major Jackson
ISBN: 9781598530834 1598530836
OCLC Number: 824777076
Description: xxxv, 298 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Color (1925). To you who read my book ; Color --
Yet do I marvel ; A song of praise ; Brown boy to brown girl ; A brown girl dead ; To a brown girl ; To a brown boy ; Black Magdalens ; Atlantic City waiter ; Near white ; Tableau ; Harlem wine ; Simon the Cyrenian speaks ; Incident ; Two who crossed a line (she crosses) ; Two who crossed a line (he crosses) ; Saturday's child ; The dance of love ; Pagan prayer ; Wisdom cometh with the years ; To my fairer brethren ; Fruit of the flower ; The shroud of color ; Heritage ; Epitaphs --
For a poet ; For my grandmother ; For a cynic ; For a singer ; For a virgin ; For a lady I know ; For a lovely lady ; For an atheist ; For an evolutionist and his opponent ; For an anarchist ; For a magician ; For a pessimist ; For a mouthy woman ; For a philosopher ; For an unsuccessful sinner ; For a fool ; For one who gayly sowed his oats ; For a skeptic ; For a fatalist ; For daughters of Magdalen ; For a wanton ; For a preacher ; For one who died singing of death ; For John Keats, apostle of beauty ; For Hazel Hall, American poet ; For Paul Laurence Dunbar ; For Joseph Conrad ; For myself ; All the dead ; For love's sake --
Oh, for a little while be kind ; If you should go ; To one who said me nay ; Advice to youth ; Caprice ; Sacrament ; Bread and wine ; Spring reminiscence ; Varia --
Suicide chant ; She of the dancing feet sings ; Judas Iscariot ; The wise ; Mary, mother of Christ ; Dialogue ; In memory of Col. Charles Young ; To my friends ; Gods ; To John Keats, poet. At spring time ; On going ; Harsh world that lashest me ; Requiescam. Copper Sun (1927). Color --
From the dark tower ; Threnody for a brown girl ; Confession ; Uncle jim ; Colored blues singer ; Colors ; The litany of the dark people ; The deep in love. Pity the deep in love ; One day we played a game ; Timid lover ; Nocturne ; Words to my love ; En passant ; Variations on a theme ; A song of sour grapes ; In memoriam ; Lament ; If love be staunch ; The spark ; Song of the rejected lover ; To one who was cruel ; Sonnet to a scornful lady ; The love tree ; At cambridge --
The wind blovveth where it listeth ; Thoughts in a zoo ; Two thoughts of death ; The poet puts his heart to school ; Love's way ; Portrait of a lover ; An old story ; To lovers of earth: fair warning ; Varia --
In spite of death ; Cor cordium ; Lines to my father ; Protest ; An epitaph ; Scandal and gossip ; Youth sings a song of rosebuds ; Hunger ; Lines to our elders ; The poet ; More than a fool's song ; And when I think ; Advice to a beauty ; Ultimatum ; Lines written in Jerusalem ; On the Mediterranean Sea ; Millennial ; At the wailing wall in Jerusalem ; To Endymion ; Epilogue ; Juvenilia --
Open door ; Disenchantment ; Leaves ; Song ; The touch ; A poem once significant, now happily not ; Under the mistletoe --
The Ballad of the Brown Girl : An Old Ballad Retold (1927). The ballad of the brown girl. The Black Christ & Other Poems (1929). Varia --
To the three for whom the book ; Tribute ; That bright chimeric beast ; At the Etoile ; Two epitaphs ; To an unknown poet ; Little sonnet to little friends ; Mood ; Counter mood ; The wind and the weather ; In the midst of life ; Minutely hurt ; Never the final stone ; Light lady ; By their fruits ; A miracle demanded ; Tongue-tied ; Ultima verba ; The foolish heart ; A wish ; For helen keller ; Asked and answered ; Two poets ; Not Sacco and Vanzetti ; A song no gentleman would sing to any lady ; Self criticism ; A thorn forever in the breast ; The proud heart ; Interlude --
The simple truth ; Therefore, adieu ; At a parting ; Dictum ; Revelation ; Bright bindings ; Ghosts ; Song in spite of myself ; Nothing endures ; There must be words ; One day I told my love ; Lesson ; The street called crooked ; The law that changeth not ; Valedictory ; Color ; To certain critics ; Black majesty ; Song of praise ; The black christ --
The black christ. from The Medea and Some Poems (1935). After a visit ; Magnets ; Any human to another ; Only the polished skeleton ; Every lover ; To France ('Though I am not the first in English terms") ; Sleep ; Medusa ; Interlude ; Three nonsense rhymes for my three goddaughters ; Sonnet ("I have not loved you in the noblest way") ; Sonnet ("some for a little while do love, and some for long") ; Sonnet ("I know now how a man whose blood is hot") ; To one not there Sonnet ("what I am saying now was said before") ; Sonnet ('these are no wind-blown rumors, soft say-sos") ; Sonnet dialogue ; Sonnet ("I would I could, as others poets have") ; Sonnet ("some things incredible I still believe") ; Sonnet ("be with me, pride; now love is gone, stay by") ; Sonnet ("although I name you not that those who read") ; To France ("I have a dream of where") ; Bilitis Sings ; Death to the poor ; The cat ; Cats ; Scottsboro, too, is worth its song. from The Lost Zoo (1940). The wakeupworld ; The-snake-that-walked-upon-his-tail. from On These I Stand (1947). Dear friends and gentle hearts ; Lines for a hospital ; A negro mother's lullaby ; Karenge ya marenge ; Christus natus est ; La belle, la douce, la grande. Uncollected Poems. To the swimmer ; I have a rendezvous with life ; In praise of boys ; Christ recrucified ; Dad ; A prayer ; A life of dreams ; Road song ; Villanelle serenade ; Singing in the rain ; From youth to age ; The poet ; Sweethearts ; When I am dead ; To W.E.B Du Bois ; Night rain ; Three hundred years ago ; A sonnet ('thank God I come of those who from the cradle") ; Song ; Sonnet ("not knowing what or whom or why I wept") ; To Edward Atkinson ; Give them the second front ; Apostrophe to the land ; Tout entiere ; A smiling Africa speaks ; Unfinished chronicle ; Hillburn --
the fair ; Mad song ; Modern mother goose ; Modern mother goose (as shaped by events) ; Elegy --
Biographical note ; Note on the texts and illustrations ; Notes.
Series Title: American poets project, 32.
Other Titles: Poems
Countee Cullen, collected poems
Countee Cullen
Responsibility: Countee Cullen ; edited by Major Jackson.
More information:

Abstract:

A major and sometimes controversial figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Countee Cullen fused a mastery of the formal lyric with a passionate engagement with themes social, religious, racial, and personal in such books as Color, Copper Sun, and The Black Christ. Certain of his poems-- "Heritage," "Yet Do I Marvel"--Are widely celebrated, but much of Cullen's work remains to be discovered. This volume restores to print a body of work of singular intensity and beauty.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/824777076>
library:oclcnum"824777076"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/824777076>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/807349>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"American poetry--African American authors"@en
schema:name"American poetry--African American authors."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"2013"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2013"
schema:description"Copper Sun (1927). Color -- From the dark tower ; Threnody for a brown girl ; Confession ; Uncle jim ; Colored blues singer ; Colors ; The litany of the dark people ; The deep in love. Pity the deep in love ; One day we played a game ; Timid lover ; Nocturne ; Words to my love ; En passant ; Variations on a theme ; A song of sour grapes ; In memoriam ; Lament ; If love be staunch ; The spark ; Song of the rejected lover ; To one who was cruel ; Sonnet to a scornful lady ; The love tree ; At cambridge -- The wind blovveth where it listeth ; Thoughts in a zoo ; Two thoughts of death ; The poet puts his heart to school ; Love's way ; Portrait of a lover ; An old story ; To lovers of earth: fair warning ; Varia -- In spite of death ; Cor cordium ; Lines to my father ; Protest ; An epitaph ; Scandal and gossip ; Youth sings a song of rosebuds ; Hunger ; Lines to our elders ; The poet ; More than a fool's song ; And when I think ; Advice to a beauty ; Ultimatum ; Lines written in Jerusalem ; On the Mediterranean Sea ; Millennial ; At the wailing wall in Jerusalem ; To Endymion ; Epilogue ; Juvenilia -- Open door ; Disenchantment ; Leaves ; Song ; The touch ; A poem once significant, now happily not ; Under the mistletoe -- The Ballad of the Brown Girl : An Old Ballad Retold (1927). The ballad of the brown girl."@en
schema:description"The Black Christ & Other Poems (1929). Varia -- To the three for whom the book ; Tribute ; That bright chimeric beast ; At the Etoile ; Two epitaphs ; To an unknown poet ; Little sonnet to little friends ; Mood ; Counter mood ; The wind and the weather ; In the midst of life ; Minutely hurt ; Never the final stone ; Light lady ; By their fruits ; A miracle demanded ; Tongue-tied ; Ultima verba ; The foolish heart ; A wish ; For helen keller ; Asked and answered ; Two poets ; Not Sacco and Vanzetti ; A song no gentleman would sing to any lady ; Self criticism ; A thorn forever in the breast ; The proud heart ; Interlude -- The simple truth ; Therefore, adieu ; At a parting ; Dictum ; Revelation ; Bright bindings ; Ghosts ; Song in spite of myself ; Nothing endures ; There must be words ; One day I told my love ; Lesson ; The street called crooked ; The law that changeth not ; Valedictory ; Color ; To certain critics ; Black majesty ; Song of praise ; The black christ -- The black christ."@en
schema:description"from The Medea and Some Poems (1935). After a visit ; Magnets ; Any human to another ; Only the polished skeleton ; Every lover ; To France ('Though I am not the first in English terms") ; Sleep ; Medusa ; Interlude ; Three nonsense rhymes for my three goddaughters ; Sonnet ("I have not loved you in the noblest way") ; Sonnet ("some for a little while do love, and some for long") ; Sonnet ("I know now how a man whose blood is hot") ; To one not there Sonnet ("what I am saying now was said before") ; Sonnet ('these are no wind-blown rumors, soft say-sos") ; Sonnet dialogue ; Sonnet ("I would I could, as others poets have") ; Sonnet ("some things incredible I still believe") ; Sonnet ("be with me, pride; now love is gone, stay by") ; Sonnet ("although I name you not that those who read") ; To France ("I have a dream of where") ; Bilitis Sings ; Death to the poor ; The cat ; Cats ; Scottsboro, too, is worth its song."@en
schema:description"Introduction -- Color (1925). To you who read my book ; Color -- Yet do I marvel ; A song of praise ; Brown boy to brown girl ; A brown girl dead ; To a brown girl ; To a brown boy ; Black Magdalens ; Atlantic City waiter ; Near white ; Tableau ; Harlem wine ; Simon the Cyrenian speaks ; Incident ; Two who crossed a line (she crosses) ; Two who crossed a line (he crosses) ; Saturday's child ; The dance of love ; Pagan prayer ; Wisdom cometh with the years ; To my fairer brethren ; Fruit of the flower ; The shroud of color ; Heritage ; Epitaphs -- For a poet ; For my grandmother ; For a cynic ; For a singer ; For a virgin ; For a lady I know ; For a lovely lady ; For an atheist ; For an evolutionist and his opponent ; For an anarchist ; For a magician ; For a pessimist ; For a mouthy woman ; For a philosopher ; For an unsuccessful sinner ; For a fool ; For one who gayly sowed his oats ; For a skeptic ; For a fatalist ; For daughters of Magdalen ; For a wanton ; For a preacher ; For one who died singing of death ; For John Keats, apostle of beauty ; For Hazel Hall, American poet ; For Paul Laurence Dunbar ; For Joseph Conrad ; For myself ; All the dead ; For love's sake -- Oh, for a little while be kind ; If you should go ; To one who said me nay ; Advice to youth ; Caprice ; Sacrament ; Bread and wine ; Spring reminiscence ; Varia -- Suicide chant ; She of the dancing feet sings ; Judas Iscariot ; The wise ; Mary, mother of Christ ; Dialogue ; In memory of Col. Charles Young ; To my friends ; Gods ; To John Keats, poet. At spring time ; On going ; Harsh world that lashest me ; Requiescam."@en
schema:description"from On These I Stand (1947). Dear friends and gentle hearts ; Lines for a hospital ; A negro mother's lullaby ; Karenge ya marenge ; Christus natus est ; La belle, la douce, la grande."@en
schema:description"from The Lost Zoo (1940). The wakeupworld ; The-snake-that-walked-upon-his-tail."@en
schema:description"Uncollected Poems. To the swimmer ; I have a rendezvous with life ; In praise of boys ; Christ recrucified ; Dad ; A prayer ; A life of dreams ; Road song ; Villanelle serenade ; Singing in the rain ; From youth to age ; The poet ; Sweethearts ; When I am dead ; To W.E.B Du Bois ; Night rain ; Three hundred years ago ; A sonnet ('thank God I come of those who from the cradle") ; Song ; Sonnet ("not knowing what or whom or why I wept") ; To Edward Atkinson ; Give them the second front ; Apostrophe to the land ; Tout entiere ; A smiling Africa speaks ; Unfinished chronicle ; Hillburn -- the fair ; Mad song ; Modern mother goose ; Modern mother goose (as shaped by events) ; Elegy -- Biographical note ; Note on the texts and illustrations ; Notes."@en
schema:description"A major and sometimes controversial figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Countee Cullen fused a mastery of the formal lyric with a passionate engagement with themes social, religious, racial, and personal in such books as Color, Copper Sun, and The Black Christ. Certain of his poems-- "Heritage," "Yet Do I Marvel"--Are widely celebrated, but much of Cullen's work remains to be discovered. This volume restores to print a body of work of singular intensity and beauty."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1203420588>
schema:genre"Poetry."@en
schema:genre"Poetry"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Collected poems"@en
schema:name"Countee Cullen"@en
schema:name"Countee Cullen, collected poems"@en
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.