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Combustion Generated Noise in Turbopropulsion Systems.

Author: Warren C Strahle; M Muthukrishnan; John C Handley; GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING.
Publisher: Ft. Belvoir Defense Technical Information Center JUL 1975.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The results are presented of a three year program investigating direct combustion noise in hydrocarbon-air flames. Tasks completed during the final year of the program have been (1) the use of an exterior facility to investigate the noise from a large, 2 inch diameter burner and (2) the use of the anechoic facility to test flames stabilized by bluff body flameholders. Emphasis in the program has been on premixed,  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Warren C Strahle; M Muthukrishnan; John C Handley; GEORGIA INST OF TECH ATLANTA SCHOOL OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING.
OCLC Number: 227399076
Description: 66 p.

Abstract:

The results are presented of a three year program investigating direct combustion noise in hydrocarbon-air flames. Tasks completed during the final year of the program have been (1) the use of an exterior facility to investigate the noise from a large, 2 inch diameter burner and (2) the use of the anechoic facility to test flames stabilized by bluff body flameholders. Emphasis in the program has been on premixed, fuel lean turbulent flames using ethylene, acetylene, propane and propylene fuels with air as the oxidizer. Conclusions of practical interest are (1) combustion noise can be an important contributor to the overall noise problem from turbopropulsion systems if the system extracts high shaft power, (2) it is not important to the nosie problem from afterburning turbopropulsion systems, (3) if the noise output of a particular combustor type is known in one installation, valid predictions may be made for the noise output of the same type of combustor in a different installation and (4) combustion noise may be a contributor to the afterburner instability problem. (Author).

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