skip to content
Coming home to eat : the pleasures and politics of local foods Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Coming home to eat : the pleasures and politics of local foods

Author: Gary Paul Nabhan
Publisher: New York : W W Norton, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Nabhan, a subsistence hunter, ethnobiologist, and activist devoted to recovering lost food traditions, gave himself a task: to spend a year trying to eat foods grown, fished, or gathered within 250 miles of his Arizona home. His book, both personal document and political screed, details this experiment from the moment Nabhan purges his kitchen of canned and other processed foods ("If this year could resolve anything  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Gary Paul Nabhan
ISBN: 9780393335057 0393335054
OCLC Number: 286487377
Description: 334 pages ; 21 cm
Contents: Spring: the cruelest months --
Eating my way through house and homeland --
Purging the canned, making room for the fresh --
Coping with death, and the life thereafter --
Riding the dunes and finding the ghosts --
Dead chemicals or peaches eaten alive --
Summer: the fertile months --
Saguaro fruit and cactus icons --
Mesquite tortillas and duck eggs --
Tomato hornworms and summer storms --
Scouting for wild greens and chiles --
Seed saving and foraging in the heartland --
The frontera grill and the frontiers of technology --
From toxic cornfields to rattlesnake roadkills --
Autumn: the feasting months --
The headwaters and the foodshed --
The fertile valleys and their wild varmints --
Sea turtle soup and by-catch stew --
The nomad's movable feast and the taste of island chicken --
Hunting mushrooms and grilling salmon --
Feasting with the dead --
Winter: the reflective months --
Of vinegars fermented and memories curdled --
The WTO in Seattle, and the spirit of St. Louis --
Hunting quail and stalking scavengers --
Mexico's breadbasket of toxins and migrants --
The desert walk for heritage and health.
Responsibility: Gary Paul Nabhan.

Abstract:

"The first manifesto of the local food movement, and it remains one of the best-eloquent, bracing, and full of vital information." -Michael Pollan  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Eloquent, richly evocative . . . a fascinating, enlightening, and moving account." -- Los Angeles Times "A tale certain to inspire gardeners, cooks, and others eager to replace convenience with Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(2)

User lists with this item (1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/286487377> # Coming home to eat : the pleasures and politics of local foods
    a schema:Book, schema:CreativeWork ;
   library:oclcnum "286487377" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/nyu> ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> ; # New York
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/641.013/e22/> ;
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/938901> ; # Gastronomy
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/196095569#Topic/food> ; # Food
   schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/94734157> ; # Gary Paul Nabhan
   schema:datePublished "2002" ;
   schema:description "Nabhan, a subsistence hunter, ethnobiologist, and activist devoted to recovering lost food traditions, gave himself a task: to spend a year trying to eat foods grown, fished, or gathered within 250 miles of his Arizona home. His book, both personal document and political screed, details this experiment from the moment Nabhan purges his kitchen of canned and other processed foods ("If this year could resolve anything for me, perhaps it would rid me of the desire to ever again buy any packaged food that boasted of its homemade flavor ... ") to a final food-gathering pilgrimage. That journey underscores Nabhan's conviction that we have too easily believed "the vacuous nutritional promises of the industrialized food that has sold our health down the river." In fact, the book encompasses an ongoing pilgrimage, during which Nabhan explores, for example, the near loss of saguaro cactus fruit as a dietary staple due to saguaro's use for "local color" in shopping malls, golf courses, and retirement centers. Readers, converted, skeptical, or just curious, will find Nabhan's book a source of many simple and stirring truths. "Until we stop craving to be somewhere else and someone else other than the animals whose very cells are constituted from the place on earth we love the most," he writes, "then there is little reason to care about the fate of native foods, family farms, or healthy landscapes and communities." But care we must, as the book shows so enlighteningly."@en ;
   schema:description "Spring: the cruelest months -- Eating my way through house and homeland -- Purging the canned, making room for the fresh -- Coping with death, and the life thereafter -- Riding the dunes and finding the ghosts -- Dead chemicals or peaches eaten alive -- Summer: the fertile months -- Saguaro fruit and cactus icons -- Mesquite tortillas and duck eggs -- Tomato hornworms and summer storms -- Scouting for wild greens and chiles -- Seed saving and foraging in the heartland -- The frontera grill and the frontiers of technology -- From toxic cornfields to rattlesnake roadkills -- Autumn: the feasting months -- The headwaters and the foodshed -- The fertile valleys and their wild varmints -- Sea turtle soup and by-catch stew -- The nomad's movable feast and the taste of island chicken -- Hunting mushrooms and grilling salmon -- Feasting with the dead -- Winter: the reflective months -- Of vinegars fermented and memories curdled -- The WTO in Seattle, and the spirit of St. Louis -- Hunting quail and stalking scavengers -- Mexico's breadbasket of toxins and migrants -- The desert walk for heritage and health."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/196095569> ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "Coming home to eat : the pleasures and politics of local foods"@en ;
   schema:productID "286487377" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/286487377#PublicationEvent/new_york_w_w_norton_2002> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/196095569#Agent/w_w_norton> ; # W W Norton
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780393335057> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/286487377> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://dbpedia.org/resource/New_York_City> # New York
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "New York" ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/938901> # Gastronomy
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Gastronomy"@en ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/94734157> # Gary Paul Nabhan
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Nabhan" ;
   schema:givenName "Gary Paul" ;
   schema:name "Gary Paul Nabhan" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780393335057>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "0393335054" ;
   schema:isbn "9780393335057" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.