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Communicable disease control and health protection handbook

Author: Jeremy HawkerNorman T BeggIain BlairRalf ReintjesJulius WeinbergAll authors
Publisher: Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, 2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 3rd edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This clear and concise text combines science with practical guidance for public-health physicians, epidemiologists, infection control nurses, microbiologists, and those training in these fields. It covers basic principles of communicable disease control and health protection, major syndromes, control of individual infections, main services and activities, organizational arrangements for all EU countries and sources  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Handbooks, manuals, etc
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Hawker, Jeremy.
Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook.
Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, ©2012
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jeremy Hawker; Norman T Begg; Iain Blair; Ralf Reintjes; Julius Weinberg; Karl Ekdahl
ISBN: 9781444346930 1444346938
OCLC Number: 773565369
Notes: 3.91.2 Other protozoal diseases.
Description: 1 online resource (456 pages)
Contents: Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook; Contents; Foreword; Abbreviations; Section 1: Introduction; 1.1 How to use this book; 1.2 Basic concepts in the epidemiology and control of infectious disease; 1.3 Health protection on-call; Section 2: Common topics; 2.1 Meningitis and meningism; 2.2 Gastrointestinal infection; 2.3 Community-acquired pneumonia; 2.4 Rash in pregnancy; 2.5 Rash and fever in children; 2.6 Illness in returning travellers; 2.7 Sexually transmitted infections; 2.8 Jaundice; 2.9 Infection in the immunocompromised; 2.10 Blood-borne viral infections. 2.11 Vaccine queries2.12 Individual measures against infections; Section 3: Diseases; 3.1 Amoebic dysentery; 3.2 Anthrax; 3.3 Bacillus cereus; 3.4 Botulism; 3.5 Brucellosis; 3.6 Burkholderia; 3.7 Campylobacter; 3.8 Chickenpox and shingles (varicella-zoster infections); 3.9 Chikungunya; 3.10 Chlamydophila pneumoniae; 3.11 Chlamydophila psittaci; 3.12 Chlamydia trachomatis (genital); 3.13 Cholera; 3.14 Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies; 3.15 Clostridium difficile; 3.16 Clostridium perfringens; 3.17 Coxsackievirus infections. 3.18 Cryptosporidiosis3.19 Cyclosporiasis; 3.20 Cytomegalovirus; 3.21 Dengue fever; 3.22 Diphtheria; 3.23 Encephalitis, acute; 3.24 Enterococci, including glycopeptide-resistant enterococci; 3.25 Epstein-Barr virus; 3.26 Escherichia coli O157 (and other E. coli gastroenteritis); 3.27 Giardiasis; 3.28 Gonorrhoea, syphilis and other acute STIs; 3.29 Hantavirus; 3.30 Head lice; 3.31 Helicobacter pylori; 3.32 Hepatitis A; 3.33 Hepatitis B; 3.34 Hepatitis C; 3.35 Delta hepatitis; 3.36 Hepatitis E; 3.37 Herpes simplex; 3.38 Haemophilus influenzae type b; 3.39 HIV; 3.40 Influenza. 3.41 Japanese B encephalitis3.42 Kawasaki disease; 3.43 Legionellosis; 3.44 Leprosy; 3.45 Leptospirosis; 3.46 Listeria; 3.47 Lyme disease; 3.48 Malaria; 3.49 Measles; 3.50 Meningococcal infection; 3.51 Molluscum contagiosum; 3.52 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); 3.53 Mumps; 3.54 Mycoplasma; 3.55 Norovirus; 3.56 Paratyphoid fever; 3.57 Parvovirus B19 (fifth disease); 3.58 Plague; 3.59 Pneumococcal infection; 3.60 Poliomyelitis; 3.61 Q fever; 3.62 Rabies; 3.63 Relapsing fever; 3.64 Respiratory syncytial virus; 3.65 Ringworm; 3.66 Rotavirus; 3.67 Rubella; 3.68 Salmonellosis. 3.69 Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)3.70 Scabies; 3.71 Shigella; 3.72 Smallpox; 3.73 Staphylococcal food poisoning; 3.74 Streptococcal infections; 3.75 Tetanus; 3.76 Threadworms; 3.77 Tick-borne encephalitis; 3.78 Toxocara; 3.79 Toxoplasmosis; 3.80 Tuberculosis; 3.81 Tularaemia; 3.82 Typhoid fever; 3.83 Typhus, other Rickettsia, Ehrlichia and Bartonella; 3.84 Vibrio parahaemolyticus; 3.85 Viral haemorrhagic fevers; 3.86 Warts and verrucae; 3.87 West Nile virus; 3.88 Whooping cough; 3.89 Yellow fever; 3.90 Yersiniosis; 3.91 Other organisms; 3.91.1 Helminths.
Responsibility: Jeremy Hawker [and others].

Abstract:

This clear and concise text combines science with practical guidance for public-health physicians, epidemiologists, infection control nurses, microbiologists, and those training in these fields. It covers basic principles of communicable disease control and health protection, major syndromes, control of individual infections, main services and activities, organizational arrangements for all EU countries and sources of further information. All chapters have been updated in line with recent changes in epidemiology, new guidelines for control and administrative changes. New chapters on pandemic p.
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