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A companion to Luis Buñuel

Author: Gwynne Edwards
Publisher: Woodbridge, Suffolk ; Rochester, NY : Tamesis, 2005.
Series: Colección Támesis., Serie A,, Monografías ;, 210.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Luis Bunuel (1900-1983) was one of the truly great film-makers of the twentieth century. Born in the Spanish village of Calanda and shaped by a repressive Jesuit education and a bourgeois family background, he reacted against both, escaped to Paris, and was soon embraced by Andre Breton's official surrealist group. His early film are his most aggressive and shocking, the slicing of the eyeball in Un Chien andalou
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Luis Buñuel; Luis Buñuel; Luis Buñuel
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Gwynne Edwards
ISBN: 185566108X 9781855661080
OCLC Number: 56051083
Description: 176 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Buñuel and the surrealists --
A surrealist in chains --
Buñuel and the bourgeoisie --
'Thank god I'm still and atheist'.
Series Title: Colección Támesis., Serie A,, Monografías ;, 210.
Responsibility: Gwynne Edwards.
More information:

Abstract:

"Luis Bunuel (1900-1983) was one of the truly great film-makers of the twentieth century. Born in the Spanish village of Calanda and shaped by a repressive Jesuit education and a bourgeois family background, he reacted against both, escaped to Paris, and was soon embraced by Andre Breton's official surrealist group. His early film are his most aggressive and shocking, the slicing of the eyeball in Un Chien andalou (1929) one of the most memorable episodes in the history of cinema. Subsequently, Bunuel worked in Mexico where, in spite of tight budgets, he made films as memorable as The Forgotten Ones (1950) and He (1952).

From 1960, greater financial and technical resources allowed him to make, in Spain and France, the films for which he is best known: Viridiana (1961), Belle de jour (1966), Tristana (1970), The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (1972), and That Obscure Object of Desire (1977). Although the French films in particular are less aggressive and more ironic than his early work, they nevertheless reveal Bunuel's continuing preoccupations: sex, bourgeois values, and religion." "In this study, Gwynne Edwards analyses Bunuel's films in the context of his personal obsessions and suggests that, in contrast to any of his fellow artists, he experienced a degree of sexual inhibition surprising in a surrealist."--BOOK JACKET.

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