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Confederate heroines : 120 southern women convicted by Union military justice

Author: Thomas P Lowry
Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, ©2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"From 1861 through 1865, southern women fought a war within a war. While most of their efforts involved activities such as rolling bandages and organizing charity fairs, many women in the Confederacy, particularly in border states, challenged Federal authority in more direct ways: smuggling maps, medicine, and munitions; aiding deserters; spying; feeding Confederate bushwhackers; cutting Federal telegraph wires.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Anecdotes
History
Material Type: Biography, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas P Lowry
ISBN: 0807129909 9780807129906
OCLC Number: 63390320
Description: xvii, 212 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Missouri --
Maryland --
Tennessee --
South of the line --
North of the line --
It takes a village --
Epilogue: Where are the others?
Responsibility: Thomas P. Lowry.
More information:

Abstract:

"From 1861 through 1865, southern women fought a war within a war. While most of their efforts involved activities such as rolling bandages and organizing charity fairs, many women in the Confederacy, particularly in border states, challenged Federal authority in more direct ways: smuggling maps, medicine, and munitions; aiding deserters; spying; feeding Confederate bushwhackers; cutting Federal telegraph wires. Thomas P. Lowry's investigation into some 75,000 Federal courts-martial - uncovered in National Archives files and mostly unexamined since the Civil War - brings to light women caught up in the inexorable Unionist judicial machinery. Their stories, published here for the first time, often in first-person testimony, compose a picture of courage and resourcefulness in the face of social, military, and legal constraints."--BOOK JACKET.

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Linked Data


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