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The Confederate Navy: a pictorial history.

Author: Philip Van Doren Stern
Publisher: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, 1962.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : [1st ed.]View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
At the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederate Navy was a very small collection of nearly anything that would float -- mostly small, unmilitary vessels and a few captured Union ships; there was not one real warship in the fleet. The North had men-of-war and a large fleet of merchant ships that could be armed quickly. As a result, the North was soon able to blockade the Southern coast and capture port after port.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Stern, Philip Van Doren, 1900-1984.
Confederate Navy.
Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, 1962
(OCoLC)644219990
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Philip Van Doren Stern
OCLC Number: 1460012
Description: 252 pages illustrations 29 cm
Contents: Introduction --
1861. A nation is born --
The first shots --
Privateers --
The first Confederate raider --
England and the Confederacy --
War on the Potomac --
The Union Navy prepares for war --
Irconclads --
The Confederacy's vulnerable coasts --
The Nashville goes to sea --
The Trent case --
The blockade and the blockade-runners --
Civil War naval guns --
1862. Invading North Carolina's coastal sounds --
The Nashville escapes --
Fort Pulaski --
The war on western waters 1 --
CSS Virginia --
The war on western waters 2 --
The capture of the CSS Teaser --
Captures and recaptures --
Blockade-running in 1862 --
Confederate raiders --
Confederate scientist : Matthew Fontaine Maury --
1863. The naval war in Texas --
The Florida escapes from Mobile --
Confederate ironclads take the offensive at Charleston --
The war on western waters 3 --
Final operations on the Mississippi --
The Atlanta and the Weehawken --
"The most brilliant daredevil cruise of the war" --
The war on Charleston --
The Alabama in the South Atlantic --
The Confederate cotton loan in Europe --
The Laird rams. The French-built ironclads --
Confederate efforts in the Pacific --
The capture of the Chesapeake --
Confederate ships and British law --
The Commodore Barney hits a torpedo --
The Union Navy builds a huge ironclad --
1864. Civil War submarines --
Armored ships in 1864 --
The Confederate Marine Corps --
Confederate torpedoes --
The Red River Campaign --
The Maury cruisers --
The Alabama's last days --
The South trains naval officers --
Supplies for the Confederate Navy --
The Tallahassee raids the Atlantic coast --
Action on the James River --
The Battle of Mobile Bay --
The last days of the Florida --
War on the Carolina sounds in 1864 --
The fate of the French-built ships --
Blockade-running in 1864 --
Rank and uniforms in the Confederate Navy --
1865. Fort Fisher --
Final operations on the James --
Blowing up the rams --
The waters give up their hidden weapons --
The Stonewall begins her brief career --
The Shenandoah : last Confederate raider.

Abstract:

At the beginning of the Civil War, the Confederate Navy was a very small collection of nearly anything that would float -- mostly small, unmilitary vessels and a few captured Union ships; there was not one real warship in the fleet. The North had men-of-war and a large fleet of merchant ships that could be armed quickly. As a result, the North was soon able to blockade the Southern coast and capture port after port. But the South fought back ingeniously, sending agents to England and France to have the finest warships built, innovating such modern weapons as the torpedo, the submarine, and the armored warship -- all of which changed the nature of naval warfare.

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Linked Data


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