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The conquest of Ainu lands : ecology and culture in Japanese expansion, 1590-1800

Author: Brett L Walker
Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, ©2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This model monograph is the first scholarly study to put the Ainu - the native people living in Ezo, the northernmost island of the Japanese archipelago - at the center of an exploration of Japanese expansion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the height of the Tokugawa shogunal era. Inspired by "New Western" historians of the United States, Brett L. Walker positions Ezo not as Japan's northern
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Brett L Walker
ISBN: 0520227360 9780520227361 0520248341 9780520248342
OCLC Number: 45958211
Description: xii, 332 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: The consolidation of the early-modern Japanese state in the north --
Shakushain's war --
The ecology of Ainu autonomy and dependence --
Symbolism and environment in trade --
The Sakhalin trade: diplomatic and ecological balance --
The Kuril trade: Russian and the question of boundaries --
Epidemic disease, medicine, and the shifting ecology of Ezo --
The role of ceremony in conquest.
Responsibility: Brett L. Walker.
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Abstract:

A monograph that places Ainu - the native people living in Ezo, the northernmost island of the Japanese archipelago - at the center of an exploration of Japanese expansion during the seventeenth and  Read more...

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"The end result is this detailed and scholarly work, which will remain seminal reading for years to come for anyone interested in understanding the demise of the Ainu and the concomitant rise to Read more...

 
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