skip to content
Conscience, equity and the Court of Chancery in early modern England Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Conscience, equity and the Court of Chancery in early modern England

Author: Dennis R Klinck
Publisher: Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, Vt. : Ashgate, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Judicial equity developed in England during the medieval period, providing an alternative access to justice for cases that the rigid structures of the common law could not accommodate. Where the common law was constrained by precedent and strict procedural and substantive rules, equity relied on principles of natural justice - or 'conscience' - to decide cases and right wrongs. Overseen by the Lord Chancellor,  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dennis R Klinck
ISBN: 9780754667742 075466774X 9780754693444 0754693449
OCLC Number: 340952900
Description: xii, 315 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Conscience and the medieval chancery --
The early sixteenth century and Christopher St. German --
The later sixteenth century --
Protestant conscience one : the early seventeenth century --
The conscience of early seventeenth-century equity --
Protestant conscience two : the later seventeenth century --
Later seventeenth-century equity and Lord Nottingham.
Responsibility: Dennis R. Klinck.
More information:

Abstract:

This study tackles the difficult yet crucial subject of the place of conscience in the development of English law, illuminating what is meant by describing the Court of Chancery as a 'court of  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

'... diligent readers can learn much from his [Klinck's] wide-ranging and penetrating analysis of shifting and alternative meanings of conscience in legal and religious texts and works of political Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (2)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/340952900>
library:oclcnum"340952900"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/340952900>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/135972595>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Great Britain. Court of Chancery"
schema:name"England and Wales. Court of Chancery"
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/139606088>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"England and Wales. Court of Chancery"
schema:name"Great Britain. Court of Chancery"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2010"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2010"
schema:description"Conscience and the medieval chancery -- The early sixteenth century and Christopher St. German -- The later sixteenth century -- Protestant conscience one : the early seventeenth century -- The conscience of early seventeenth-century equity -- Protestant conscience two : the later seventeenth century -- Later seventeenth-century equity and Lord Nottingham."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/219249986>
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Conscience, equity and the Court of Chancery in early modern England"@en
schema:numberOfPages"315"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/340952900>
schema:reviewBody""Judicial equity developed in England during the medieval period, providing an alternative access to justice for cases that the rigid structures of the common law could not accommodate. Where the common law was constrained by precedent and strict procedural and substantive rules, equity relied on principles of natural justice - or 'conscience' - to decide cases and right wrongs. Overseen by the Lord Chancellor, equity became one of the twin pillars of the English legal system with the Court of Chancery playing an ever greater role in the legal life of the nation. Yet, whilst the Chancery was commonly - and still sometimes is - referred to as a 'court of conscience', there is remarkably little consensus about what this actually means, or indeed whose conscience is under discussion." "This study tackles the difficult subject of the place of conscience in the development of English equity during a crucial period of legal history. Addressing the notion of conscience as a juristic principle in the Court of Chancery during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the book explores how the concept was understood and how it figured in legal judgment. Drawing upon both legal and broader cultural materials, it explains how that understanding differed from modern notions and how it might have been more consistent with criteria we commonly associate with objective legal judgment than the modern, more 'subjective', concept of conscience. The study culminates with an examination of the chancellorship of Lord Nottingham (1673-82), who, because of his efforts to transform equity from a jurisdiction associated with discretion into one based on rules, is conventionally regarded as the father of modern, 'systematic' equity." "From a broader perspective,this study can be seen as a contribution to the enduring discussion of the relationship between 'formal' accounts of law, which see it as systems of rules, and less formal accounts, which try to make room for intuitive moral or prudential reasoning."--BOOK JACKET."
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GBA9A4192>

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.