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Contingency plans for war in Western Europe, 1920-1940

Author: Mark Jacobsen; Robert Levine; William Schwabe; Rand Strategy Assessment Center.; United States. Department of Defense. Director of Net Assessment.
Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : Rand, [1985]
Series: R (Rand Corporation), R-3281-NA.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In an attempt to determine the effects of war planning on the behavior of countries in crises and wars, this report analyzes the national-level planning that preceded and shaped the German invasion of the Low Countries and northern France in 1940. As a study of war planning in the 1930s by France, Britain, Belgium, and Germany, it sheds considerable light on the way in which political, financial, and manpower  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Jacobsen; Robert Levine; William Schwabe; Rand Strategy Assessment Center.; United States. Department of Defense. Director of Net Assessment.
ISBN: 0833006614 9780833006615
OCLC Number: 12215643
Notes: "Prepared for the Director of Net Assessment, Office of the Secretary of Defense."
"June 1985."
"R-3281-NA."
Description: xxi, 190 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series Title: R (Rand Corporation), R-3281-NA.
Responsibility: Mark Jacobsen, Robert Levine, William Schwabe ; a report from the Rand Strategy Assessment Center.

Abstract:

In an attempt to determine the effects of war planning on the behavior of countries in crises and wars, this report analyzes the national-level planning that preceded and shaped the German invasion of the Low Countries and northern France in 1940. As a study of war planning in the 1930s by France, Britain, Belgium, and Germany, it sheds considerable light on the way in which political, financial, and manpower constraints guide the military planning process: Threat assessment played a comparatively minor part in planning. Instead, available resources were the single most important determinant of plans. The situation of a totalitarian nation bent on changing the European status quo opposed by a coalition of democracies offers obvious analogies with present-day NATO. The authors discuss the similarities and differences in the historical and current situations, and draw three types of parallels: conceptual parallels, planning process comparisons, and direct similarities.

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