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Contracting in conflicts : the path to reform

Author: Richard Fontaine; John A Nagl; Allison Stanger; Center for a New American Security.
Publisher: Washington, DC : Center for a New American Security, 2010.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : National government publication : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When our nation goes to war, contractors go with it. In both Iraq and Afghanistan today, there are more private contractors than U.S. troops on the ground. This state of affairs is likely to endure. Now, and for the foreseeable future, the United States will be unable to engage in conflicts or reconstruction and stabilization operations of any significant size without private contractors. Changes in business  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Fontaine; John A Nagl; Allison Stanger; Center for a New American Security.
ISBN: 9781935087298 1935087290
OCLC Number: 639302451
Notes: Title from PDF title page (viewed on June 8, 2010).
"June 2010."
Description: 1 online resource (59 p.) : col. ill.
Details: Mode of access: Internet from Center for a New American Security web site. Adobe Acrobat Reader required.
Contents: Introduction --
A brief history of ES&R contracting --
ES&R contracting today --
Fraud, waste and abuse --
Cost --
Military implications --
Foreign policy implications --
Legal implications --
The path to reform --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: by Richard Fontaine and John Nagl ; foreword by Allison Stanger.

Abstract:

When our nation goes to war, contractors go with it. In both Iraq and Afghanistan today, there are more private contractors than U.S. troops on the ground. This state of affairs is likely to endure. Now, and for the foreseeable future, the United States will be unable to engage in conflicts or reconstruction and stabilization operations of any significant size without private contractors. Changes in business practices, the provision of government services and the character of modern conflict, together with limits on the size of the American military, diplomatic and development corps, are driving the size and scope of expeditionary contracting to unprecedented proportions. Absent a significant reduction in America's international commitments and perceived global interests, the employment of private contractors in future American conflicts is here to stay. This report outlines a full range of issues raised by expeditionary contracting and offers recommendations for how the United States-- both the government and the community of private contracting firms-- can strike a balance among the greater efficiency and effectiveness necessary to support American missions overseas; the versatility and flexibility required in a rapidly evolving strategic environment; and the proper oversight, accountability and transparency expected by American taxpayers.

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Linked Data


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