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Contractors in American conflicts : adapting to a new reality

Author: Richard Fontaine; John A Nagl; Center for a New American Security.
Publisher: Washington, DC : Center for a New American Security, 2009.
Series: Working paper (Center for a New American Security)
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When our nation goes to war, contractors go with it. Contractors have become an enduring feature of modern American conflicts, and the United States cannot now engage in hostilities or in reconstruction and stabilization operations without them. At their peak, there were more contractors on the ground in Iraq than American troops in uniform and there are more contractors today in Afghanistan than there are U.S.  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Fontaine; John A Nagl; Center for a New American Security.
OCLC Number: 491260908
Notes: Title from PDF title page (viewed on December 21, 2009).
"December 2009."
Description: 1 online resource (20 p.) : col. ill.
Details: Mode of access: Internet from Center for a New American Security web site. Adobe Acrobat Reader required.
Contents: Introduction --
ES&R contracting over time --
ES&R contracting at present : a snapshot --
Why contracting has grown, and why it's here to stay --
Concerns about the use of contractors --
Military implications --
Legal implications --
Foreign policy implications --
"Smart contracting".
Series Title: Working paper (Center for a New American Security)
Responsibility: by Richard Fontaine and John Nagl.

Abstract:

When our nation goes to war, contractors go with it. Contractors have become an enduring feature of modern American conflicts, and the United States cannot now engage in hostilities or in reconstruction and stabilization operations without them. At their peak, there were more contractors on the ground in Iraq than American troops in uniform and there are more contractors today in Afghanistan than there are U.S. troops on the ground. However, while private security contractors (PSC) like Blackwater (now knows as Xe Services) have gotten the bulk of public and congressional attention, they only compromise about 5 percent of all contractors in hostile environments. This working paper, which is part of the CNAS project Contracting in Conflicts, addresses the other 95 percent. That 95 percent represents the vast majority of all the tasks carried out by U.S. contractors in theater, and it has been plagued by its own set of problems, including insufficient oversight, inadequate integration into operational planning, and ambiguous legal status. In order for the United States to adapt to the key role that contractors will play in future hostilities, it must establish new policies and rules of the road.

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Linked Data


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