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The contribution of human capital to China's economic growth

Author: John Whalley; Xiliang Zhao; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2010.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 16592.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This paper develops a human capital measure in the sense of Schultz (1960) and then reevaluates the contribution of human capital to China's economic growth. The results indicate that human capital plays a much more important role in China's economic growth than available literature suggests, 38.1% of economic growth over 1978-2008, and even higher for 1999-2008. In addition, because human capital formation  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Whalley, John.
Contribution of human capital to China's economic growth.
Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©2010
(DLC) 2011655828
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: John Whalley; Xiliang Zhao; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 692180428
Description: 1 online resource (33 pages) : illustrations.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 16592.
Responsibility: John Whalley, Xiliang Zhao.

Abstract:

This paper develops a human capital measure in the sense of Schultz (1960) and then reevaluates the contribution of human capital to China's economic growth. The results indicate that human capital plays a much more important role in China's economic growth than available literature suggests, 38.1% of economic growth over 1978-2008, and even higher for 1999-2008. In addition, because human capital formation accelerated following the major educational expansion increases after 1999 (college enrollment in China increased nearly fivefold between 1997 and 2007) while growth rates of GDP are little changed over the period after 1999, total factor productivity increases fall if human capital is used in growth accounting as we suggest. TFP, by our calculations, contributes 16.92% of growth between 1978 and 2008, but this contribution is -7.03% between 1999 and 2008. Negative TFP growth along with the high contribution of physical and human capital to economic growth seem to suggest that there have been decreased in the efficiency of inputs usage in China or worsened misallocation of physical and human capital in recent years. These results underscore the importance of efficient use of human capital, as well as the volume of human capital creation, in China₂s growth strategy.
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