skip to content
Coordination of strength exertion during the chair-rise movement in very old people.
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Coordination of strength exertion during the chair-rise movement in very old people.

Author: U Lindemann Affiliation: Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Geriatrische Rehabilitation, Auerbachstr 110, Stuttgart, Germany. ulrich.lindemann@rbk.deR MucheM StuberW ZijlstraK HauerAll authors
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 2007 Jun; 62(6): 636-40
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: ArticleFirstBritish Library Serials
Summary:
BACKGROUND: Changes in performance of standing up from a chair have been related to measures of strength or power. However, the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer requires that the individual exerts forces with appropriate magnitude and timing. These coordinative aspects have received less attention. This study aims to analyze differences in STS performance in older people based on measures that are derived from ground  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

More like this

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: U Lindemann Affiliation: Robert-Bosch-Krankenhaus, Geriatrische Rehabilitation, Auerbachstr 110, Stuttgart, Germany. ulrich.lindemann@rbk.de; R Muche; M Stuber; W Zijlstra; K Hauer; C Becker
ISSN:1079-5006
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 146590278
Awards:

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Changes in performance of standing up from a chair have been related to measures of strength or power. However, the sit-to-stand (STS) transfer requires that the individual exerts forces with appropriate magnitude and timing. These coordinative aspects have received less attention. This study aims to analyze differences in STS performance in older people based on measures that are derived from ground reaction forces (GRFs) during STS transfer. METHODS: One hundred thirty-five participants (84.5% women; mean age 82.5 years) stood up from a chair as fast as possible. Time of stabilization after reaching an upright position, power, maximum vertical GRF, increase of vertical GRF, overshoot of vertical GRF over body weight, and left-right difference of GRF were measured by a force plate under each foot. To explain variance of total time to stand up, these variables were used as independent variables in a linear regression model. RESULTS: Eighty-one percent of variance of total time to stand up was explained by the independent variables. The strongest predictor of total time was time of stabilization (F = 459.4). Another model of linear regression explained 37% of variance of time to reach an upright position, with increase of GRF as the strongest predictor (F = 38.3). Influence of maximum vertical GRF was weak in both models. CONCLUSIONS: Variables related to coordination of strength, measured during STS transfer, were able to explain a high proportion of variance of time to rise from a chair. Stabilization after reaching an upright position seems to be a parameter worth further investigation.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (1)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

  • Read  (by 1 person)
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.