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Counterfeiting in colonial America

Author: Kenneth Scott
Publisher: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Scott examines the prevalence of counterfeiting in colonial America and the difficulties the authorities had in tracking down the offenders. He brings to life the many colorful figures who indulged in this nefarious practice, including organized gangs from Massachusetts to South Carolina, such as the members of the Dover Money Club, and numerous women practitioners, including Freelove Lippincott and Mary Peck
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Kenneth Scott
ISBN: 0812217314 9780812217315
OCLC Number: 42842460
Notes: Originally published: New York : Oxford University Press, 1957.
Description: xxiii, 283 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Contents: Foreword / David R. Johnson --
Ch. 1. Introduction --
Ch. 2. Wampum, Boston Money, and Foreign Coin --
Ch. 3. Women Money Makers --
Ch. 4. Counterfeits from Great Britain and Ireland --
Ch. 5. Counterfeiting in the Southern Provinces --
Ch. 6. John Potter and Rhode Island Counterfeiters in 1741 --
Ch. 7. Coining and Counterfeiting in the Jerseys --
Ch. 8. Samuel Weed and the Derby Gang --
Ch. 9. Joseph Bill and His Massachusetts Gang --
Ch. 10. Owen Sullivan and the Dover Money Club --
Ch. 11. Silversmiths as Counterfeiters --
Ch. 12. The Pittsylvania and Morristown Gangs --
Ch. 13. John Bull Turns Counterfeiter.
Responsibility: Kenneth Scott ; foreword by David R. Johnson.

Abstract:

"Scott examines the prevalence of counterfeiting in colonial America and the difficulties the authorities had in tracking down the offenders. He brings to life the many colorful figures who indulged in this nefarious practice, including organized gangs from Massachusetts to South Carolina, such as the members of the Dover Money Club, and numerous women practitioners, including Freelove Lippincott and Mary Peck Butterworth. One of the book's most important themes is that counterfeiting was ubiquitous, transcending socioeconomic, ethnic, and gender lines. Counterfeiters had innumerable ways to practice the art, as Scott shows in illustrative detail.

In a final chapter, Scott assesses counterfeiting during the Revolution, when the British government found it an effective means for undermining the fledgling national economy." "As much a social history of colonial America as it is a narrative of one of the world's oldest crimes, Counterfeiting in Colonial America is sure to appeal to scholars, numismatists, and general readers alike."--BOOK JACKET.

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