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Coyote stories

Author: Mourning Dove; Heister Dean Guie
Publisher: Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 1990.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A powerful force and yet the butt of humor, the coyote figure runs through the folklore of many American Indian tribes. He can be held up as a "terrible example" of conduct, a model of what not to do, and yet admired for a careless. anarchistic energy that suggests unlimited possibilities. Mourning Dove, an Okanagan, knew him well from the legends handed down by her people. She preserved them for posterity in Coyote  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Folklore
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Mourning Dove, 1888-1936.
Coyote stories.
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 1990
(OCoLC)551662975
Online version:
Mourning Dove, 1888-1936.
Coyote stories.
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 1990
(OCoLC)607814396
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mourning Dove; Heister Dean Guie
ISBN: 0803231458 9780803231450 9780803281691 0803281692
OCLC Number: 20595223
Notes: Reprint. Originally published: Caldwell, Idaho : Caxton Printers, 1933.
"A Bison book."
Description: xvii, 246 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Responsibility: by Mourning Dove (Humishuma) ; edited and illustrated by Heister Dean Guie, with notes by L.V. McWhorter (Old Wolf) and a foreword by Chief Standing Bear ; introduction and notes to the Bison Book edition by Jay Miller.
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Abstract:

A powerful force and yet the butt of humor, the coyote figure runs through the folklore of many American Indian tribes. He can be held up as a "terrible example" of conduct, a model of what not to do, and yet admired for a careless. anarchistic energy that suggests unlimited possibilities. Mourning Dove, an Okanagan, knew him well from the legends handed down by her people. She preserved them for posterity in Coyote Stories, originally published in 1933. Here is Coyote, the trickster, the selfish individualist, the imitator, the protean character who indifferently puts the finishing touches on a world soon to receive human beings. And here is Mole, his long-suffering wife, and all the other Animal People, including Fox, Chipmunk, Owl-Woman, Rattlesnake, Grizzly Bear, Porcupine, and Chickadee. Here it is revealed why Skunk's tail is black and white, why Spider has such long legs, why Badger is so humble, and why Mosquito bites people. These entertaining, psychologically compelling stories will be welcomed by a wide spectrum of readers.

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