skip to content
The crescent obscured : the United States and the Muslim world, 1776-1815 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The crescent obscured : the United States and the Muslim world, 1776-1815

Author: Robert J Allison
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1995.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the beginning of the colonial period to the recent conflicts in the Middle East, encounters with the Muslim world have helped Americans to define national identity and purpose. Looking at the early years of the republic, Robert Allison traces the image of Islam in the American mind as the new nation constructed its ideology and system of government. Allison begins with Americans' first contacts with the Muslim  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Allison, Robert J.
Crescent obscured.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1995
(OCoLC)624332015
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Robert J Allison
ISBN: 0195086120 9780195086126
OCLC Number: 29878199
Description: xviii, 266 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Ch. 1. American Policy Toward the Muslim World --
Ch. 2. United States and the Specter of Islam --
Ch. 3. Peek Into the Seraglio: Americans, Sex, and the Muslim World --
Ch. 4. American Slavery and the Muslim World --
Ch. 5. American Captives in the Muslim World --
Ch. 6. Muslim World and American Benevolence --
Ch. 7. American Consuls in the Muslim World --
Ch. 8. Remembering the Tripolitan War --
Ch. 9. James Riley, the Return of the Captive.
Responsibility: Robert J. Allison.
More information:

Abstract:

From the beginning of the colonial period to the recent conflicts in the Middle East, encounters with the Muslim world have helped Americans to define national identity and purpose. Looking at the early years of the republic, Robert Allison traces the image of Islam in the American mind as the new nation constructed its ideology and system of government. Allison begins with Americans' first contacts with the Muslim world in the Barbary states of North Africa. In 1785 Algiers seized two American merchant vessels, and by 1815 some six hundred Americans would be held captive in the Muslim world. No longer protected by the British navy, captive American sailors languished in Algiers while their government debated what action to take. Allison examines the responsibility the U.S. government felt it had to its citizens, the role private citizens had in directing international policy, and what captivity meant to the captives as well as to their compatriots at home. The American war with Tripoli ended with Americans believing they had overcome the menace of despotism and freed themselves from the fate of other nations. With this came a new sense of national purpose which manifested itself in paintings, poetry, drama, and politics. Examining the literature and histories of the period, Allison considers Americans' visions of Muhammed, as well as the differences in ideas of political power, gender relations, and slavery.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/29878199>
library:oclcnum"29878199"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/29878199>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1995"
schema:description"From the beginning of the colonial period to the recent conflicts in the Middle East, encounters with the Muslim world have helped Americans to define national identity and purpose. Looking at the early years of the republic, Robert Allison traces the image of Islam in the American mind as the new nation constructed its ideology and system of government. Allison begins with Americans' first contacts with the Muslim world in the Barbary states of North Africa. In 1785 Algiers seized two American merchant vessels, and by 1815 some six hundred Americans would be held captive in the Muslim world. No longer protected by the British navy, captive American sailors languished in Algiers while their government debated what action to take. Allison examines the responsibility the U.S. government felt it had to its citizens, the role private citizens had in directing international policy, and what captivity meant to the captives as well as to their compatriots at home. The American war with Tripoli ended with Americans believing they had overcome the menace of despotism and freed themselves from the fate of other nations. With this came a new sense of national purpose which manifested itself in paintings, poetry, drama, and politics. Examining the literature and histories of the period, Allison considers Americans' visions of Muhammed, as well as the differences in ideas of political power, gender relations, and slavery."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/32151799>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The crescent obscured : the United States and the Muslim world, 1776-1815"@en
schema:numberOfPages"266"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.