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Cretan women : Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra in Latin poetry

Author: Rebecca Armstrong
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.
Series: Oxford classical monographs.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Cretan Women examines the ways in which myths about Pasiphae, Ariadne, and Phaedra come to be woven into the fabric of the Roman literary world. Both forming and conforming to the stereotype of the lustful Cretan woman, these are characters who walk the boundaries between the wild and the tame, the virtuous and the vicious, the abominable and the divine. As Cretans, the women belong to an island filled with  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Rebecca Armstrong
ISBN: 9780199284030 0199284032
OCLC Number: 62134767
Notes: Based on the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Oxford, 2001.
Description: ix, 351 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Ethics and poetics : literary and personal memory in representations of Cretan women --
The call of the wild --
Vice and virtue --
Pasiphae in The eclogues and Ars amatoria --
Ariadne in Catullus 64 --
Ariadne and Ovid --
Phaedra from elegiac lover to stoic antiexemplum : Heroides 4 and Seneca, Phaedra.
Series Title: Oxford classical monographs.
Responsibility: Rebecca Armstrong.
More information:

Abstract:

Investigates the myths of three Cretan women - King Minos' wife, Pasiphae, and their daughters Ariadne and Phaedra - as they appear in Latin poetry of the late Republic and early Empire. This title  Read more...

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'a stimulating read...' Laurel Fulkerson, Classical World 20/05/08

 
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