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Crusades for freedom : Memphis and the political transformation of the American South

Author: G Wayne Dowdy
Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
During the first half of the twentieth century, the city of Memphis was governed by the Shelby County Democratic Party controlled by Edward Hull Crump, described by Time magazine as "the most absolute political boss in the U.S."Crusades for Freedomchronicles the demise of the Crump political machine and the corresponding rise to power of the South's two minorities, African Americans and Republicans. Between the  Read more...
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Named Person: Edward Hull Crump
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: G Wayne Dowdy
ISBN: 9781604734232 160473423X
OCLC Number: 387785978
Description: x, 183 pages : illustrations, photographs ; 24 cm
Contents: "We are living in a different day" --
"My family ties in the South" --
"All the cooperation we can muster" --
"Why didn't someone tell us this before?" --
"To compel the white race" --
"Please don't do that" --
"A great movement here in Memphis."
Responsibility: G. Wayne Dowdy.

Abstract:

During the first half of the twentieth century, the city of Memphis was governed by the Shelby County Democratic Party controlled by Edward Hull Crump, described by Time magazine as "the most absolute political boss in the U.S."Crusades for Freedomchronicles the demise of the Crump political machine and the corresponding rise to power of the South's two minorities, African Americans and Republicans. Between the years 1948 and 1968, Memphis emerged as a battleground in the struggle to create a strong two-party South. For the first time in its history, both Republican and Democratic presidential candidates campaigned vigorously for the Bluff City's votes. Closely tied to these changing political fortunes was the struggle of African Americans to overturn two centuries of discrimination. At the same time, many believed that the city needed a more modern political structure to meet the challenges of the 1950s and 1960s, preferably a mayor-city council governmental structure. By 1968 the segregated social order had collapsed, black politicians were firmly entrenched within the Democratic party, southern whites had swelled the ranks of the GOP, and Memphis had adopted a new city charter.

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