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The Cubalogues : Beat writers in revolutionary Havana

Author: Todd F Tietchen
Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Immediately after the Cuban Revolution, Havana fostered an important transnational intellectual and cultural scene. Later, Castro would strictly impose his vision of Cuban culture on the populace and the United States would bar its citizens from traveling to the island, but for these few fleeting years the Cuban capital was steeped in many liberal and revolutionary ideologies and influences.
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Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Todd F Tietchen
ISBN: 9780813035208 0813035201
OCLC Number: 613426168
Description: xiii, 194 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction: the "stranger relations" of Beat --
Hemispheric Beats (in the Bay Area and beyond) --
On the crisis of the underground and a politics of intractable plurality --
Unsettling the democratic score: music and urban insurgency --
Beat publics and the "middle-aged" Left --
(Back) towards a stranger democracy.
Responsibility: Todd F. Tietchen.

Abstract:

"Immediately after the Cuban Revolution, Havana fostered an important transnational intellectual and cultural scene. Later, Castro would strictly impose his vision of Cuban culture on the populace and the United States would bar its citizens from traveling to the island, but for these few fleeting years the Cuban capital was steeped in many liberal and revolutionary ideologies and influences.

Some of the most prominent figures in the Beat Movement, including Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Amiri Baraka, were attracted to the new Cuba as a place where people would be racially equal, sexually free, and politically enfranchised. What they experienced had resounding and lasting literary effects both on their work and on the many writers and artists they encountered and fostered."--Pub. desc.

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