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A culture of deference : Congress, the President, and the course of the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq

Author: Festus Ugboaja Ohaegbulam
Publisher: New York : Peter Lang, ©2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This book explores the culture of deference by the legislative branch to the executive branch on foreign policy issues, particularly regarding the George W. Bush administration's rush to war in Iraq in 2003. By authorizing President Bush to go to war in Iraq at his own discretion in its October 2002 resolution, the 107th Congress abdicated its constitutional responsibility and its members failed to honor their oath  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Ohaegbulam, Festus Ugboaja.
Culture of deference.
New York : Peter Lang, c2007
(OCoLC)653033866
Named Person: George W Bush; George W Bush
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Festus Ugboaja Ohaegbulam
ISBN: 9780820495446 0820495441 9780820495385 0820495387
OCLC Number: 77270802
Description: ix, 309 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Terrorism and the foreign policy of President George W. Bush --
The US constitution and American foreign policy --
Presidential war making --
A culture of deference in Congress to the Presidency on Foreign Affairs in recent historical perspective --
Background to the George W. Bush administration's war in Iraq --
The George W. Bush administration's case for war in Iraq --
An evaluation of the George W. Bush administration's case for war in Iraq --
Congress defers to the George W. Bush administration on war in Iraq --
The war in Iraq and its consequences --
Consequences of deference by congress to the executive branch on foreign affairs.
Responsibility: F. Ugboaja Ohaegbulam.
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Abstract:

"This book explores the culture of deference by the legislative branch to the executive branch on foreign policy issues, particularly regarding the George W. Bush administration's rush to war in Iraq in 2003. By authorizing President Bush to go to war in Iraq at his own discretion in its October 2002 resolution, the 107th Congress abdicated its constitutional responsibility and its members failed to honor their oath to uphold the Constitution of the United States. Although the "war powers" are constitutionally those of Congress, historically presidents have engaged in war making and Congress has with limited success attempted to curb such war making. This book traces how this culture of deference to the chief executive on war making evolved and how, especially in the case of Iraq, it has adversely affected the interests of the nation, its constitutional framework, and its position in the world. This book will serve as an excellent text for courses on U.S. foreign policy, U.S. diplomatic history, and the role of Congress."--BOOK JACKET.

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