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Damascus after the Muslim conquest : text and image in early Islam

Author: Nancy A Khalek
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, ©2011
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Before it fell to Muslim armies in AD 635-6 Damascus had a long and prestigious history as a center of Christianity. How did the city, which became capital of the Islamic Empire, and its people, negotiate the transition from a late antique, or early Byzantine world to an Islamic culture? In this innovative study, Nancy Khalek demonstrates that the changes that took place in Syria during the formative period of  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
(DLC) 2010039645
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Nancy A Khalek
ISBN: 0199876193 9780199876198
OCLC Number: 760413551
Description: 1 online resource (viii, 204 p.) : ill., maps.
Contents: 1. Narrative and Early Islamic History ---
2. Telling Stories: Historical Texts in Early Islamic Syria ---
3. Icons: John the Baptist and Sanctified Spaces in Early Islamic Syria ---
4. Iconic Texts: Damascus in the Medieval Imagination.
Responsibility: Nancy Khalek.
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Abstract:

Before it fell to Muslim armies in AD 635-6 Damascus had a long and prestigious history as a center of Christianity. How did the city, which became capital of the Islamic Empire, and its people, negotiate the transition from a late antique, or early Byzantine world to an Islamic culture? In this innovative study, Nancy Khalek demonstrates that the changes that took place in Syria during the formative period of Islamic life were not a matter of the replacement of one civilization by another as a result of military conquest, but rather of shifting relationships and practices in a multi-faceted social and cultural setting. Even as late antique forms of religion and culture persisted, the formation of Islamic identity was effected by the people who constructed, lived in, and narrated the history of their city. Khalek draws on the evidence of architecture, and the testimony of pilgrims, biographers, geographers, and historians to shed light on this process of identity formation. Offering a fresh approach to the early Islamic period, she moves the study of Islamic origins beyond a focus on issues of authenticity and textual criticism, and initiates an interdisciplinary discourse on narrative, story-telling, and the interpretations of material culture. -- Book description.

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This collection offers raw history, untainted and unfilteres by modern political frameworks, interpretations, or opinions, representing a refreshing new approach to the study of Iraq. ... There are Read more...

 
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