skip to content
Darkest America : black minstrelsy from slavery to hip-hop Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Darkest America : black minstrelsy from slavery to hip-hop

Author: Yuval Taylor; Jake Austen
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Yuval Taylor and Jake Austen investigate the complex history of black minstrelsy, adopted in the mid-nineteenth century by African American performers who played the grinning blackface fool to entertain black and white audiences. We now consider minstrelsy an embarrassing relic, but once blacks and whites alike saw it as a black art form--and embraced it as such. And, as the authors reveal, black minstrelsy remains  Read more...
You are not connected to the Valley City State University Library network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Off Campus Login
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Yuval Taylor; Jake Austen
ISBN: 9780393070989 0393070980
OCLC Number: 755704993
Description: xvi, 364 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 22 cm
Contents: Racial pixies : how Dave Chappelle got bamboozled by the Black minstrel tradition --
Darkest America : how nineteenth-century Black minstrelsy made blackface black --
Of cannibals and kings : how New Orleans' Zulu Krewe survived one hundred years of blackface --
Nobody : how Bert Williams dignified blackface --
I'se regusted : how Stepin Fetchit, Amos, Andy, and company brought Black minstrelsy to the twentieth-century screen --
Dyn-o-mite : how Cosby blew up the minstrel tradition, and J.J. put it back together --
That's why darkies were born : how Black popular singers kept minstrelsy's musical legacy alive --
Eazy duz it : how Black minstrelsy bum-rushed hip-hop --
We just love to dramatize : how Zora Neale Hurston let her Black minstrel roots show --
New millennium minstrel show : how Spike Lee and Tyler Perry brought the Black minstrelsy debate to the twenty-first century.
Other Titles: Black minstrelsy from slavery to hip hop
Responsibility: Yuval Taylor and Jake Austen.

Abstract:

Yuval Taylor and Jake Austen investigate the complex history of black minstrelsy, adopted in the mid-nineteenth century by African American performers who played the grinning blackface fool to entertain black and white audiences. We now consider minstrelsy an embarrassing relic, but once blacks and whites alike saw it as a black art form--and embraced it as such. And, as the authors reveal, black minstrelsy remains deeply relevant to popular black entertainment, particularly in the work of contemporary artists like Dave Chappelle, Flavor Flav, Spike Lee, and Lil Wayne. Darkest America explores the origins, heyday, and present-day manifestations of this tradition, exploding the myth that it was a form of entertainment that whites foisted on blacks, and shining a sure-to-be controversial light on how these incendiary performances can be not only demeaning but also, paradoxically, liberating.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.