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Daughter of the desert : the remarkable life of Gertrude Bell

Author: Georgina Howell
Publisher: London : Macmillan, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Archaeologist, spy, Arabist, linguist, author, poet, photographer, mountaineer and nation builder, Gertrude Bell was born in 1868 into a world of privilege and plenty. The daughter of a wealthy industrialist, Gertrude turned her back on house parties and debutante balls, choosing instead to read history at Oxford, where she took a first in only two years." "Having scaled Oxford's ivory tower and become frustrated  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Howell, Georgina, 1942-
Daughter of the desert.
London : Macmillan, 2006
(OCoLC)659351997
Named Person: Gertrude Lowthian Bell; Gertrude Lowthian Bell
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Georgina Howell
ISBN: 9781405045872 1405045876
OCLC Number: 64314112
Awards: Shortlisted for BBC Four Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction 2007.
Description: xvii, 518 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Gertrude and Florence --
Education --
The civilized woman --
Becoming a person --
Mountaineering --
Desert travel --
Dick Doughty-Wylie --
Limit of endurance --
Escape --
War work --
Cairo, Delhi, Basra --
Government through Gertrude --
Anger --
Faisal --
Coronation --
Staying and leaving --
Chronology.
Responsibility: Georgina Howell.

Abstract:

At a time when women were still largely excluded from both education and the workplace, Gertrude Bell was an archaeologist, spy, Arabist, linguist, author, poet, photographer and mountaineer, but  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""Archaeologist, spy, Arabist, linguist, author, poet, photographer, mountaineer and nation builder, Gertrude Bell was born in 1868 into a world of privilege and plenty. The daughter of a wealthy industrialist, Gertrude turned her back on house parties and debutante balls, choosing instead to read history at Oxford, where she took a first in only two years." "Having scaled Oxford's ivory tower and become frustrated by the conventional life she was expected to lead, she took up mountaineering with the same skill and dedication she had applied to her studies, ultimately conquering the Alps' most challenging peak, the Matterhorn. But her passion was the desert, where she travelled alone, initially as an archaeologist. Soon, however, through her knowledge of Arabic and tribal affiliations she became indispensable to the Cairo Intelligence Office of the British government. A friend and colleague of T.E. Lawrence during the First World War, and at the time considerably more famous than he, she went on to advise the Viceroy of India, then travelled from Delhi to the front line in Mesopotamia as an army major. There she took up and steadily upheld the principle of an autonomous Arab nation for Iraq, promoting and manipulating the election of King Faisal to the throne and helping to draw the borders of the fledgling state, which would prosper under the same dynasty for thirty-two years." "Daughter of the Desert is her story, drawing on Gertrude's own writings, both published and unpublished. It is a portrait of a woman who transcended the restrictions of her class and age and in so doing created a remarkable and enduring legacy."--BOOK JACKET."
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