skip to content
David and Goliath : underdogs, misfits, and the art of battling giants Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

David and Goliath : underdogs, misfits, and the art of battling giants

Author: Malcolm Gladwell
Publisher: New York : Little, Brown and Company, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This book uncovers the hidden rules that shape the balance between the weak and the mighty and the powerful and the dispossessed. In it the author challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks. He begins  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Malcolm Gladwell
ISBN: 9780316204361 0316204366 9780316251785 031625178X 0316239852 9780316239851
OCLC Number: 827257589
Description: ix, 305 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Contents: Goliath : "Am I a dog that you should come to me with sticks?" --
pt. 1. The advantages of disadvantages (and the disadvantages of advantages) --
Vivek Ranadivé: "It was really random. I mean, my father had never played basketball before." --
Teresa DeBrito: "My largest class was twenty-nine kids. Oh, it was fun." --
Caroline Sacks: "If I'd gone to the University of Maryland, I'd still be in science." --
pt. 2. The theory of desirable difficulty --
David Boies: You wouldn't wish dyslexia on your child. Or would you? --
Emil "Jay" Freireich: "How Jay did it, I don't know." --
Wyatt Walker: "De rabbit is de slickest o' all de animals de Lawd ever made." --
pt. 3. The limits of power --
Rosemary Lawlor: "I wasn't born that way. This was forced upon me." --
Wilma Derksen: "We have all done something dreadful in our lives, or have felt the urge to." --
André Trocmé: "We feel obliged to tell you that there are among us a certain number of Jews."
Responsibility: Malcolm Gladwell.

Abstract:

This book uncovers the hidden rules that shape the balance between the weak and the mighty and the powerful and the dispossessed. In it the author challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks. He begins with the real story of what happened between the giant and the shepherd boy (David and Goliath) those many years ago. From there, the book examines Northern Ireland's Troubles, the minds of cancer researchers and civil rights leaders, murder and the high costs of revenge, and the dynamics of successful and unsuccessful classrooms, all to demonstrate how much of what is beautiful and important in the world arises from what looks like suffering and adversity. -- From book jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

All user tags (2)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(10)

User lists with this item (32)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/827257589>
library:oclcnum"827257589"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/827257589>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"First edition."
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2013"
schema:description"This book uncovers the hidden rules that shape the balance between the weak and the mighty and the powerful and the dispossessed. In it the author challenges how we think about obstacles and disadvantages, offering a new interpretation of what it means to be discriminated against, or cope with a disability, or lose a parent, or attend a mediocre school, or suffer from any number of other apparent setbacks. He begins with the real story of what happened between the giant and the shepherd boy (David and Goliath) those many years ago. From there, the book examines Northern Ireland's Troubles, the minds of cancer researchers and civil rights leaders, murder and the high costs of revenge, and the dynamics of successful and unsuccessful classrooms, all to demonstrate how much of what is beautiful and important in the world arises from what looks like suffering and adversity. -- From book jacket."@en
schema:description"Goliath : "Am I a dog that you should come to me with sticks?" -- pt. 1. The advantages of disadvantages (and the disadvantages of advantages) -- Vivek Ranadivé: "It was really random. I mean, my father had never played basketball before." -- Teresa DeBrito: "My largest class was twenty-nine kids. Oh, it was fun." -- Caroline Sacks: "If I'd gone to the University of Maryland, I'd still be in science." -- pt. 2. The theory of desirable difficulty -- David Boies: You wouldn't wish dyslexia on your child. Or would you? -- Emil "Jay" Freireich: "How Jay did it, I don't know." -- Wyatt Walker: "De rabbit is de slickest o' all de animals de Lawd ever made." -- pt. 3. The limits of power -- Rosemary Lawlor: "I wasn't born that way. This was forced upon me." -- Wilma Derksen: "We have all done something dreadful in our lives, or have felt the urge to." -- André Trocmé: "We feel obliged to tell you that there are among us a certain number of Jews.""@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1411896106>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"David and Goliath : underdogs, misfits, and the art of battling giants"@en
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.