skip to content
The day the presses stopped : a history of the Pentagon papers case Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The day the presses stopped : a history of the Pentagon papers case

Author: David Rudenstine
Publisher: Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A powerful analysis of one of the most perplexing problems in a democracy--striking the balance between the government's need to keep information confidential and the public's right to be informed. By focusing on one highly charged case, legal scholar Rudenstine puts democracy under a microscope, assessing its strength during a crisis. The result is an account that remains the standard history of this landmark legal
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Trials, litigation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Rudenstine
ISBN: 0520086724 9780520086722 0520213823 9780520213821
OCLC Number: 33276576
Description: x, 416 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: McNamara's study --
Daniel Ellsberg --
The New York Times publishes --
Nixon's turnabout --
The Justice Department's recommendation --
The Times is restrained --
On the eve of the Times trial --
Inside the White House, part 1 --
The Washington Post publishes --
The Friday hearing: the public session --
The Friday hearing: the closed session --
Gurfein's decision --
The Post is restrained --
On the eve of the Post's trial --
Gesell's decision --
The Second Circuit --
The D.C. Circuit --
Inside the White House, part 2 --
The Supreme Court takes the case --
The briefs --
The argument --
The decision --
The impact of the disclosures --
Criminal investigations and impeachable offenses --
The Supreme Court's decision and democracy.
Responsibility: David Rudenstine.
More information:

Abstract:

An account that provides a perspective on one of the significant legal struggles in American history: the Nixon administration's efforts to prohibit "The New York Times" and "The Washington Post"  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"A masterful examination of the inside political tactics and journalistic decision-making process involved in the case."--Bill Wallace, "San Francisco Chronicle

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/33276576>
library:oclcnum"33276576"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/33276576>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/192149064>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"New York Times Company."
schema:name"New York Times (Firm)"
schema:name"New York Times Company"
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"1996"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1996"
schema:description"Commissioned by Defense Secretary Robert McNamara and classified as "Top Secret - Sensitive," the 7,000-page Pentagon Papers traced the U.S. involvement in Vietnam from the 1940s through the late 1960s. In 1971 Daniel Ellsberg made the study available to the New York Times, which struggled for three months over whether and how to publish the report. On June 13, 1971, the Times finally went to press with the government's secret history of its land war in Southeast Asia."@en
schema:description"McNamara's study -- Daniel Ellsberg -- The New York Times publishes -- Nixon's turnabout -- The Justice Department's recommendation -- The Times is restrained -- On the eve of the Times trial -- Inside the White House, part 1 -- The Washington Post publishes -- The Friday hearing: the public session -- The Friday hearing: the closed session -- Gurfein's decision -- The Post is restrained -- On the eve of the Post's trial -- Gesell's decision -- The Second Circuit -- The D.C. Circuit -- Inside the White House, part 2 -- The Supreme Court takes the case -- The briefs -- The argument -- The decision -- The impact of the disclosures -- Criminal investigations and impeachable offenses -- The Supreme Court's decision and democracy."@en
schema:description"A powerful analysis of one of the most perplexing problems in a democracy--striking the balance between the government's need to keep information confidential and the public's right to be informed. By focusing on one highly charged case, legal scholar Rudenstine puts democracy under a microscope, assessing its strength during a crisis. The result is an account that remains the standard history of this landmark legal confrontation."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/837006828>
schema:genre"Trials, litigation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The day the presses stopped : a history of the Pentagon papers case"@en
schema:numberOfPages"416"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.