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D.C. voting rights

Author: Colin Soloway
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : CQ Press, 2008.
Series: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 14.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This November, in addition to electing a new president, Americans will vote for a third of the Senate and every member of the House. The 535 lawmakers in Congress represent the interests of 300 million citizens on vital issues from war and peace to taxes and spending. But the District's 580,000 residents have no such representatives to vote their interests. Last year the House passed a bill to provide the District  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Colin Soloway
OCLC Number: 232957984
Notes: Title from caption (viewed on June 30, 2008).
"April 11, 2008."
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Series Title: CQ researcher, v. 18, no. 14.
Other Titles: District of Columbia voting rights
Should Washington citizens have a vote in Congress?
Responsibility: by Colin Soloway.

Abstract:

This November, in addition to electing a new president, Americans will vote for a third of the Senate and every member of the House. The 535 lawmakers in Congress represent the interests of 300 million citizens on vital issues from war and peace to taxes and spending. But the District's 580,000 residents have no such representatives to vote their interests. Last year the House passed a bill to provide the District with a full vote in the House for the first time in 200 years, but a Republican filibuster blocked the measure in the Senate. Voting-rights advocates argue that there is no constitutional barrier to representation, while opponents insist the Framers clearly intended not to give the District a vote in Congress. In the final analysis, however, advocates blame party politics for Washington's voteless status, saying Washington is heavily Democratic, and Republicans are loathe to giving them more muscle in Congress.

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