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The death of Scripture and the rise of biblical studies

Author: Michael C Legaspi
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
Series: Oxford studies in historical theology.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The Bible has always been a contested legacy, and during the Enlightenment, Europe's scriptural inheritance surfaced once again at a critical moment as scholars guided by a new vision of a post-theological age remade the Bible. In place of the familiar scriptural Bibles that belonged to Christian and Jewish communities, they created a new form: the academic Bible. In this book, Michael Legaspi examines the creation  Read more...
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Named Person: Johann David Michaelis; Johann David Michaelis
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael C Legaspi
ISBN: 9780199845880 0199845883 9780195394351 0195394356
OCLC Number: 424499901
Awards: Winner of John Templeton Award for Theological Promise 2011.
Description: xiv, 222 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Contents: From Scripture to text --
Bible and theology at an Enlightenment university --
The study of classical antiquity at Göttingen --
Michaelis and the dead Hebrew language --
Lowth, Michaelis, and the invention of biblical poetry --
Michaelis, Moses, and the recovery of the Bible.
Series Title: Oxford studies in historical theology.
Responsibility: Michael C. Legaspi.
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Abstract:

The Death of Scripture and the Rise of Biblical Studies examines the creation of the academic Bible. Beginning with the fragmentation of biblical interpretation in the centuries after the  Read more...

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"Theologians should thank [Legaspi] for initiating what one hopes will be a long and fruitful, if not irenic, conversation."--Theological Studies"The primary value of this volume, and it is Read more...

 
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