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Democracy and development : the devil in the details

Author: Torsten Persson; Guido Enrico Tabellini; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, 2006.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 11993.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Abstract: Does democracy promote economic development? We review recent attempts to address this question, which exploit the within-country variation associated with historical transitions in and out of democracy. The answer is positive, but depends -- in a subtle way -- on the details of democratic reforms. First, democratizations and economic liberalizations in isolation each induce growth accelerations, but  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Torsten Persson; Guido Enrico Tabellini; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 63515566
Notes: "January 2006."
Cover title.
Description: 1 online resource (14, [3] pages).
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 11993.
Responsibility: Torsten Persson, Guido Tabellini.

Abstract:

Abstract: Does democracy promote economic development? We review recent attempts to address this question, which exploit the within-country variation associated with historical transitions in and out of democracy. The answer is positive, but depends -- in a subtle way -- on the details of democratic reforms. First, democratizations and economic liberalizations in isolation each induce growth accelerations, but countries liberalizing their economy before extending political rights do better than those carrying out the opposite sequence. Second, different forms of democratic government and different electoral systems lead to different fiscal trade policies: this might explain why new presidential democracies grow faster than new parliamentary democracies. Third, it is important to distinguish between expected and actual political reforms: expectations of regime change have an independent effect on growth, and taking expectations into account helps identify a stronger growth effect of democracy.
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