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Democracy and education : an introduction to the philosophy of education.

Author: John Dewey
Publisher: New York : The Free Press ; London : Collier-Macmillan, 1966, ©1944.
Series: Free Press paperback, 90737.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st Free Press paperback edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Publisher description: John Dewey (1859-1952) believed that learning was active and schooling unnecessarily long and restrictive. His idea was that children came to school to do things and live in a community which gave them real, guided experiences which fostered their capacity to contribute to society. For example, Dewey believed that students should be involved in real-life tasks and challenges: maths could be  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Dewey, John, 1859-1952.
Democracy and education.
New York : The Free Press; London : Collier-Macmillan, 1966, ©1944
(OCoLC)621974661
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Dewey
ISBN: 020519527X 9780205195275 0029073707 9780029073704
OCLC Number: 2579555
Description: vi, 378 pages ; 21 cm.
Contents: Education as a necessity of life --
Education as a social function --
Education as direction --
Education as growth --
Preparation, unfolding and formal discipline --
Education as conservative and progressive --
The democratic conception in education --
Aims in education --
Natural developments and social efficiency as Aims --
Interest and discipline --
Experience and thinking --
Thinking in education --
The nature of method --
The nature of subject matter --
Play and work in the curriculum --
The significance of geography and history --
Science in the course of study --
Educational values --
Labor and leisure --
Intellectual and practical studies --
Physical and social studies : naturalism and humanism --
The individual and the world --
Vocational aspects of education --
Theories of knowledge --
Theories of morals.
Series Title: Free Press paperback, 90737.

Abstract:

Conveys the progressive educator's revolutionary theories on the nature, purpose, and function of education in a democracy.  Read more...

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