skip to content
The demography of Roman Egypt Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The demography of Roman Egypt

Author: Roger S Bagnall; Bruce W Frier
Publisher: Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Series: Cambridge studies in population, economy, and society in past time, 23.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
(Publisher-supplied data) The traditional demographic regime of ancient Greece and Rome is almost entirely unknown; but our best chance for understanding its characteristics is provided by the three hundred census returns that survive on papyri from Roman Egypt. These returns, which date from the first three centuries AD, list the members of ordinary households living in the Nile valley: not only family members, but  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Roger S Bagnall; Bruce W Frier
ISBN: 0521461235 9780521461238 9780521025966 0521025966
OCLC Number: 28927049
Description: xix, 354 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Series Title: Cambridge studies in population, economy, and society in past time, 23.
Responsibility: Roger S. Bagnall and Bruce W. Frier.
More information:

Abstract:

(Publisher-supplied data) The traditional demographic regime of ancient Greece and Rome is almost entirely unknown; but our best chance for understanding its characteristics is provided by the three hundred census returns that survive on papyri from Roman Egypt. These returns, which date from the first three centuries AD, list the members of ordinary households living in the Nile valley: not only family members, but lodgers and slaves. The Demography of Roman Egypt has a complete and accurate catalogue of all demographically relevant information contained in the returns. On the basis of this catalogue, the authors use modern demographic methods and models to reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt. They recreate a more or less typical Mediterranean population as it survived and prospered nearly two millennia ago.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/28927049>
library:oclcnum"28927049"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/28927049>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1071476>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Social Conditions--history--Egypt."@en
schema:name"Population"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:description"(Publisher-supplied data) The traditional demographic regime of ancient Greece and Rome is almost entirely unknown; but our best chance for understanding its characteristics is provided by the three hundred census returns that survive on papyri from Roman Egypt. These returns, which date from the first three centuries AD, list the members of ordinary households living in the Nile valley: not only family members, but lodgers and slaves. The Demography of Roman Egypt has a complete and accurate catalogue of all demographically relevant information contained in the returns. On the basis of this catalogue, the authors use modern demographic methods and models to reconstruct the patterns of mortality, marriage, fertility and migration that are likely to have prevailed in Roman Egypt. They recreate a more or less typical Mediterranean population as it survived and prospered nearly two millennia ago."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/19477916>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The demography of Roman Egypt"@en
schema:numberOfPages"354"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.