skip to content
Design thinking.
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Design thinking.

Author: T Brown Affiliation: IDEO, Palo Alto, California, USA. tbrown@ideo.com
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Harvard business review, 2008 Jun; 86(6): 84-92, 141
Other Databases: WorldCatWorldCatWorldCat
Summary:
In the past, design has most often occurred fairly far downstream in the development process and has focused on making new products aesthetically attractive or enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising. Today, as innovation's terrain expands to encompass human-centered processes and services as well as products, companies are asking designers to create ideas rather than to simply dress them up.  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

More like this

 

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving;

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: T Brown Affiliation: IDEO, Palo Alto, California, USA. tbrown@ideo.com
ISSN:0017-8012
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 264592300
Awards:

Abstract:

In the past, design has most often occurred fairly far downstream in the development process and has focused on making new products aesthetically attractive or enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising. Today, as innovation's terrain expands to encompass human-centered processes and services as well as products, companies are asking designers to create ideas rather than to simply dress them up. Brown, the CEO and president of the innovation and design firm IDEO, is a leading proponent of design thinking--a method of meeting people's needs and desires in a technologically feasible and strategically viable way. In this article he offers several intriguing examples of the discipline at work. One involves a collaboration between frontline employees from health care provider Kaiser Permanente and Brown's firm to reengineer nursing-staff shift changes at four Kaiser hospitals. Close observation of actual shift changes, combined with brainstorming and rapid prototyping, produced new procedures and software that radically streamlined information exchange between shifts. The result was more time for nursing, better-informed patient care, and a happier nursing staff. Another involves the Japanese bicycle components manufacturer Shimano, which worked with IDEO to learn why 90% of American adults don't ride bikes. The interdisciplinary project team discovered that intimidating retail experiences, the complexity and cost of sophisticated bikes, and the danger of cycling on heavily trafficked roads had overshadowed people's happy memories of childhood biking. So the team created a brand concept--"Coasting"--to describe a whole new category of biking and developed new in-store retailing strategies, a public relations campaign to identify safe places to cycle, and a reference design to inspire designers at the companies that went on to manufacture Coasting bikes.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

User lists with this item (2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/264592300> # Design thinking.
    a schema:Article, schema:CreativeWork ;
    library:oclcnum "264592300" ;
    rdfs:comment "949 $l Journal Article" ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/139479099#Topic/efficiency_organizational> ; # Efficiency, Organizational
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/139479099#Topic/product_line_management> ; # Product Line Management
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/139479099#Person/brown_t> ; # Brown T
    schema:description "In the past, design has most often occurred fairly far downstream in the development process and has focused on making new products aesthetically attractive or enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising. Today, as innovation's terrain expands to encompass human-centered processes and services as well as products, companies are asking designers to create ideas rather than to simply dress them up. Brown, the CEO and president of the innovation and design firm IDEO, is a leading proponent of design thinking--a method of meeting people's needs and desires in a technologically feasible and strategically viable way. In this article he offers several intriguing examples of the discipline at work. One involves a collaboration between frontline employees from health care provider Kaiser Permanente and Brown's firm to reengineer nursing-staff shift changes at four Kaiser hospitals. Close observation of actual shift changes, combined with brainstorming and rapid prototyping, produced new procedures and software that radically streamlined information exchange between shifts. The result was more time for nursing, better-informed patient care, and a happier nursing staff. Another involves the Japanese bicycle components manufacturer Shimano, which worked with IDEO to learn why 90% of American adults don't ride bikes. The interdisciplinary project team discovered that intimidating retail experiences, the complexity and cost of sophisticated bikes, and the danger of cycling on heavily trafficked roads had overshadowed people's happy memories of childhood biking. So the team created a brand concept--"Coasting"--to describe a whole new category of biking and developed new in-store retailing strategies, a public relations campaign to identify safe places to cycle, and a reference design to inspire designers at the companies that went on to manufacture Coasting bikes." ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/139479099> ;
    schema:isPartOf <http://worldcat.org/issn/0017-8012#86_6> ;
    schema:name "Design thinking." ;
    schema:pageStart "84" ;
    schema:productID "264592300" ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/264592300> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/139479099#Topic/efficiency_organizational> # Efficiency, Organizational
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Efficiency, Organizational" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/139479099#Topic/product_line_management> # Product Line Management
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Product Line Management" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/issn/0017-8012>
    a schema:Periodical ;
    rdfs:label "Harvard business review" ;
    schema:issn "0017-8012" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.