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Developing an anti-ageist approach within law

Author: Margaret Hall; Law Commission of Ontario.
Publisher: Toronto, Ont. : Law Commission of Ontario, 2009
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This paper suggests an approach to evaluating legislation through an anti-ageist "lens," focusing on two areas that may be subject to legislation and that will tend to disproportionately affect older adults: substitute decision making and elder abuse and exploitation. The evaluative lens used asks the following general questions: Does the legislation reflect negative ageist stereotypes and/or paternalistic attitudes  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Margaret Hall; Law Commission of Ontario.
OCLC Number: 632162237
Notes: "July 31, 2009."
Description: 1 online resource (60 p.)
Contents: Introduction --
Framing the discussion: United Nations principles and the national framework on ageing --
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms --
Substitute decision making --
Elder abuse and exploitation --
Conclusions.
Responsibility: Margaret Hall ; written for the Law Commission of Ontario.
More information:

Abstract:

This paper suggests an approach to evaluating legislation through an anti-ageist "lens," focusing on two areas that may be subject to legislation and that will tend to disproportionately affect older adults: substitute decision making and elder abuse and exploitation. The evaluative lens used asks the following general questions: Does the legislation reflect negative ageist stereotypes and/or paternalistic attitudes (explicitly or implicitly)? Is the policy or legislation based on the unarticulated premise that with age comes increasing incompetence and decreasing intellectual capacity? Are there sufficient mechanisms provided for by the legislation to prevent or protect against the legislation being implemented in an ageist manner (including the acting-out of individual ageism, given the prevalence of ageist attitudes)? Does the legislation respond appropriately to the real needs of older persons as a group (understanding that older adults are extremely diverse), recognising that older adults generally are situated differently from younger people and have different needs?

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