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The Development Impact of The Illegality of Drug Trade

Author: Philip Keefer; Norman V Loayza; Rodrigo R Soares
Publisher: Washington, D.C : The World Bank, 2008.
Series: World Bank E-Library Archive
Edition/Format:   Computer file : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This essay reviews many of the less considered consequences of the war on drugs, particularly the consequences for developing countries, and weighs them against the evidence that exists regarding the likely efficacy of current strategies to curb drug use and trade. The most important unintended consequences of drug prohibition are the following. First, the large demand for drugs, particularly in developed countries,  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Philip Keefer; Norman V Loayza; Rodrigo R Soares
OCLC Number: 874237684
Reproduction Notes: Reproduction. s.l.
Description: 1 online resource (36 p.)
Series Title: World Bank E-Library Archive
Responsibility: Keefer, Philip.

Abstract:

This essay reviews many of the less considered consequences of the war on drugs, particularly the consequences for developing countries, and weighs them against the evidence that exists regarding the likely efficacy of current strategies to curb drug use and trade. The most important unintended consequences of drug prohibition are the following. First, the large demand for drugs, particularly in developed countries, generates the possibility of massive profits to potential drug providers. Since they cannot be organized freely and under the protection of the law, they resort to the formation of organized crime groups, using violence and corruption as their means of survival and expansion. In severe cases, the challenge to the state is such that public stability and safety are severely compromised. Second, prohibition and its derived illegal market imply the expropriation of endowments and resources used to produce and trade drugs. In many instances, this entails the transfer of wealth from poor to rich countries and from poor peasants to rich (and ruthless) traders. Third, criminalization can exacerbate the net health effects of drug use. These consequences are so pernicious that they call for a fundamental review of drug policy around the world.

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