skip to content
The Development of British civil affairs and its employment in the British sector of allied military operations during the Battle of Normandy, June to August 1944 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The Development of British civil affairs and its employment in the British sector of allied military operations during the Battle of Normandy, June to August 1944

Author: E R Flint; Cranfield University.
Publisher: Cranfield University, 2009.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Cranfield, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Civil Affairs and its more robust sibling, Military Government, were militaryorganisations designed to ensure that basic civil order and welfare weremaintained in those allied and enemy states encountered on operations duringthe Second World War. In so doing, they enabled formation commanders tofocus on defeating enemy forces without being distracted by possible civilianproblems. Using the battle of Normandy as a  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: E R Flint; Cranfield University.
OCLC Number: 757064836
Description: p. : digital, PDF file.
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.

Abstract:

Civil Affairs and its more robust sibling, Military Government, were militaryorganisations designed to ensure that basic civil order and welfare weremaintained in those allied and enemy states encountered on operations duringthe Second World War. In so doing, they enabled formation commanders tofocus on defeating enemy forces without being distracted by possible civilianproblems. Using the battle of Normandy as a case study, this research assessesthe utility of Civil Affairs in supporting military needs during operations. Thiscontrasts with previous studies that concentrate on aspects of social anddiplomatic history. If the need for Civil Affairs was generally axiomatic, there was much debate as tothe extent and method of delivery required. Civil Affairs quickly recognised thatin dealing with direct problems such as ?disorganisation, disease and unrest? itwas necessary for seemingly indirect aspects of civilian life to be maintained. Various forms of bureaucratic friction resulted and several Civil Affairsapproaches were used, before the model for the North West Europe campaignwas agreed. Nevertheless, the organisation employed in Normandy wasarguably the most extensive and best prepared of the war. However, it also hadto deal with many different civilian problems and in trying militarycircumstances. Consequently, the battle is fertile ground for the examination ofthe extent and nature of the organisation?s operational utility. Using primary and secondary sources, this paper argues that Civil Affairs wasmilitarily both useful and necessary. Furthermore, it was able to provide widerdiplomatic and political benefits as well as serving core military needs. Theresearch concludes by acknowledging that whilst mistakes were made, thevarious improvements made to Civil Affairs in preparation for, together with thelessons learnt during, Normandy stood the organisation in good stead for thesignificantly larger problems encountered later in the war.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/757064836>
bgn:inSupportOf"Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Cranfield, 2009."
library:oclcnum"757064836"
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typej.0:Web_document
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typebgn:Thesis
rdf:valueUnknown value: deg
rdf:valueUnknown value: dct
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2009"
schema:description"Civil Affairs and its more robust sibling, Military Government, were militaryorganisations designed to ensure that basic civil order and welfare weremaintained in those allied and enemy states encountered on operations duringthe Second World War. In so doing, they enabled formation commanders tofocus on defeating enemy forces without being distracted by possible civilianproblems. Using the battle of Normandy as a case study, this research assessesthe utility of Civil Affairs in supporting military needs during operations. Thiscontrasts with previous studies that concentrate on aspects of social anddiplomatic history. If the need for Civil Affairs was generally axiomatic, there was much debate as tothe extent and method of delivery required. Civil Affairs quickly recognised thatin dealing with direct problems such as ?disorganisation, disease and unrest? itwas necessary for seemingly indirect aspects of civilian life to be maintained. Various forms of bureaucratic friction resulted and several Civil Affairsapproaches were used, before the model for the North West Europe campaignwas agreed. Nevertheless, the organisation employed in Normandy wasarguably the most extensive and best prepared of the war. However, it also hadto deal with many different civilian problems and in trying militarycircumstances. Consequently, the battle is fertile ground for the examination ofthe extent and nature of the organisation?s operational utility. Using primary and secondary sources, this paper argues that Civil Affairs wasmilitarily both useful and necessary. Furthermore, it was able to provide widerdiplomatic and political benefits as well as serving core military needs. Theresearch concludes by acknowledging that whilst mistakes were made, thevarious improvements made to Civil Affairs in preparation for, together with thelessons learnt during, Normandy stood the organisation in good stead for thesignificantly larger problems encountered later in the war."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1024868283>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The Development of British civil affairs and its employment in the British sector of allied military operations during the Battle of Normandy, June to August 1944"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:url<http://hdl.handle.net/1826/4017>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.