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Developmental fairy tales : evolutionary thinking and modern Chinese culture

Author: Andrew F Jones
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1992 Deng Xiaoping famously declared, "Development is the only hard imperative." What ensued was the transformation of China from a socialist state to a capitalist market economy. The spirit of development has since become the prevailing creed of the People's Republic, helping to bring about unprecedented modern prosperity, but also creating new forms of poverty, staggering social upheaval, physical dislocation,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Xun Lu; Vasiliĭ Eroshenko; Vasiliĭ Eroshenko; Xun Lu
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Andrew F Jones
ISBN: 9780674047952 0674047958
OCLC Number: 676725382
Description: 259 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: The iron house of narrative : Lu Xun and the late Qing fiction of evolutionary adventure --
Inherit the wolf : Lu Xun, natural history, and narrative form --
The child as history in republican China : a discourse on development --
Playthings of history --
A narrow cage: Eroshenko, Lu Xun, and the modern Chinese fairy tale.
Responsibility: Andrew F. Jones.

Abstract:

Jones revises our understanding of modern China by tracing the ways that evolutionary works developed into a form of vernacular knowledge in modern Chinese literature. From children's primers to  Read more...

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Andrew Jones masterfully analyzes how notions of the modern in China have been thoroughly invested by an obsession with development. In doing so, he makes new sense out of well-trodden ideas, and the Read more...

 
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