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Diary : holograph, 1835-1875.

Author: George Templeton Strong
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Diary, 1835-1875. Strong wrote an extremely lengthy and detailed narrative and commentary about persons, events, and institutions in New York City, particularly his attendance and continued interest in Columbia College; his career as an attorney in the firm of his father, George Washington Strong; his interest in law and his attitude towards current practices among lawyers; his frequent attendance at concerts,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Diaries
Photographic prints
Drawings
Paper money
Clippings
Ephemera
Personal narratives
Named Person: George Templeton Strong; George Washington Strong; Ellen R Strong; Samuel B Ruggles; Charles E Strong; George C Anthon
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: George Templeton Strong
OCLC Number: 58775484
Description: 4 v. (ca. 2,250 p.)

Abstract:

Diary, 1835-1875. Strong wrote an extremely lengthy and detailed narrative and commentary about persons, events, and institutions in New York City, particularly his attendance and continued interest in Columbia College; his career as an attorney in the firm of his father, George Washington Strong; his interest in law and his attitude towards current practices among lawyers; his frequent attendance at concerts, operas, oratorios, and the theatre; his membership in numerous civic and cultural organizations, particularly as president of the Philharmonic Society and treasurer of the Sanitary Commission; numerous social activities, including friendships with his cousin, Charles Edward Strong, and with George Christian Anthon; family affairs, including his marriage to Ellen Ruggles, daughter of Samuel B. Ruggles, and the death of their first child. There are some pen and ink drawings in the diary, and various other papers are pasted in or laid in, including clippings, photographs, letters, Confederate banknotes, and other printed ephemera.

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