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The diary of Dawid Sierakowiak : five notebooks from the Łódź ghetto

Auteur : Dawid Sierakowiak; Alan Adelson; Kamil Turowski
Éditeur : New York : Oxford University Press, 1996.
Édition/format :   Livre : Biographie : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
"In the evening I had to prepare food and cook supper, which exhausted me totally. In politics there's absolutely nothing new. Again, out of impatience I feel myself beginning to fall into melancholy. There is really no way out of this for us." This is Dawid Sierakowiak's final diary entry. Soon after writing it, the young author died of tuberculosis, exhaustion, and starvation - the Holocaust syndrome known as
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Détails

Genre/forme : Diaries
Personal narratives
Personne nommée : Dawid Sierakowiak; Dawid Sierakowiak
Type d’ouvrage : Biographie
Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Dawid Sierakowiak; Alan Adelson; Kamil Turowski
ISBN : 0195104501 9780195104509
Numéro OCLC : 33819171
Description : xiii, 271 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contenu : One life lost --
L'od'z is occupied --
Never-ending hunger --
We live in constant fear --
Bloodthirsty Nazi beast --
There is no way out.
Responsabilité : edited and with an introduction by Alan Adelson ; translated from the Polish original by Kamil Turowski ; foreword by Lawrence L. Langer.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

"In the evening I had to prepare food and cook supper, which exhausted me totally. In politics there's absolutely nothing new. Again, out of impatience I feel myself beginning to fall into melancholy. There is really no way out of this for us." This is Dawid Sierakowiak's final diary entry. Soon after writing it, the young author died of tuberculosis, exhaustion, and starvation - the Holocaust syndrome known as "ghetto disease." After the liberation of the Lodz Ghetto,

his notebooks were found stacked on a cookstove, ready to be burned for heat. Young Sierakowiak was one of more than 60,000 Jews who perished in that notorious urban slave camp, a man-made hell which was the longest surviving concentration of Jews in Nazi Europe. The diary comprises a remarkable legacy left to humanity by its teenage author. It is one of the most fastidiously detailed accounts ever rendered of modern life in human bondage. Off mountain climbing and.

studying in southern Poland during the summer of 1939, Dawid begins his diary with a heady enthusiasm to experience life, learn languages, and read great literature. He returns home under the quickly gathering clouds of war. Abruptly Lodz is occupied by the Nazis, and the Sierakowiak family is among the city's 200,000 Jews who are soon forced into a sealed ghetto, cut off from the outside world. The wonder of the diary is that every bit of hardship yields wisdom from.

Dawid's remarkable intellect. Reading it, you become a prisoner with him in the ghetto, and with disconcerting intimacy you begin to experience the incredible process by which the vast majority of the Jews of Europe were annihilated in World War II. Significantly, the youth has no doubt about the consequence of deportation out of the ghetto: "Deportation into scrap metal," he calls it. A committed communist and the unit leader of an underground organization, he crusades.

for more food for the ghetto's school children. But when invited to pledge his life to a suicide resistance squad, he writes that he cannot become a "professional revolutionary." He owes his strength and life to the care of his family.

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Données liées


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