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Dickinson : selected poems and commentaries

Auteur: Emily Dickinson; Helen Vendler
Uitgever: Cambridge, Mass. : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.
Editie/Formaat:   Boek : EngelsAlle edities en materiaalsoorten bekijken.
Database:WorldCat
Samenvatting:
In selecting these poems for commentary the author chooses to exhibit many aspects of Dickinson's work as a poet, from her first person poems to the poems of grand abstraction, from her ecstatic verses to her unparalleled depictions of emotional numbness, from her comic anecdotes to her painful poems of aftermath. Included here are many expected favorites as well as more complex and less often anthologized poems.  Meer lezen...
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Genre/Vorm: anthologie
commentaire
Genoemd persoon: Emily Dickinson; Emily - poésie Dickinson; Emily - poésie Dickinson; Emily Dickinson; Emily Dickinson
Soort document: Boek
Alle auteurs / medewerkers: Emily Dickinson; Helen Vendler
ISBN: 9780674048676 0674048679
OCLC-nummer: 542263643
Beschrijving: xiv, 535 pages ; 24 cm
Inhoud: Introduction : Dickinson the writer --
Selected poems and commentaries --
23. In the name of the Bee --
--
32. The morns are meeker than they were --
--
90. An altered look about the hills --
--
122. These are the days when Birds come back --
--
124. Safe in their Alabaster Chambers --
--
129. Our lives are Swiss --
--
134. Did the Harebell loose her girdle --
138. To fight aloud, is very brave --
--
165. I have never seen "Volcanoes" --
--
181. A wounded Deer --
leaps highest --
--
187. Through the Straight Pass of Suffering --
194. Title divine, is mine. --
204. I'll tell you how the Sun rose --
--
224. An awful Tempest mashed the air --
--
232. He forgot --
and I --
remembered --
--
236. Some keep the Sabbath going to Church --
--
238. How many times these low feet staggered --
--
240. Bound a Trouble --
and Lives will bear it --
--
243. That after Horror --
that 'twas us --
--
256. The Robin's my Criterion for Tune --
--
259. A Clock stopped --
--
269. Wild nights --
Wild nights! --
276. Civilization --
spurns --
the Leopard! --
279. Of all the Souls that stand create --
--
284. The Zeroes taught Us --
Phosphorus --
--
288. My first well Day --
since many ill --
--
291. It sifts from Leaden Sieves --
--
294. A Weight with Needles on the pounds --
--
306. A Shady friend --
for Torrid days --
--
312. I can wade Grief --
--
314. "Hope" is the thing with feathers --
--
319. Of Bronze --
and Blaze --
--
320. There's a certain Slant of light, --
325. There came a Day --
at Summer's full --
--
330. He put the belt around my life --
--
337. Of nearness to her sundered Things --
340. I felt a Funeral, in my Brain, --
341. 'Tis so appalling --
it exhilirates --
--
348. I would not paint --
a picture --
--
351. She sights a Bird --
she chuckles --
--
355. It was not Death, for I stood up, --
359. A Bird, came down the Walk --
--
360. The Soul has Bandaged moments --
--
365. I know that He exists. --
372. After great pain, a formal feeling comes --
--
373. This World is not conclusion. --
383. I like to see it lap the Miles --
--
401. Dare you see a Soul at the "White Heat"? --
407. One need not be a Chamber --
to be Haunted --
--
409. The Soul selects her own society --
420. There are two Ripenings --
--
423. The first Day's Night had come --
--
425. 'Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch, --
430. A Charm invests a face --
439. I had been hungry, all the Years --
--
444. It would have starved a Gnat --
--
446. This was a Poet --
--
448. I died for Beauty --
but was scarce --
450. The Outer --
from the Inner --
466. I dwell in Possibility --
--
479. Because I could not stop for Death --
--
515. There is a pain --
so utter --
--
517. A still --
Volcano --
Life --
--
519. This is my letter to the World --
524. It feels a shame to be Alive --
--
528. 'Tis not that Dying hurts us so --
--
533. I reckon --
When I count at all --
--
550. I measure every Grief I meet --
558. A Visitor in Marl --
--
578. The Angle of a Landscape --
--
584. We dream --
it is good we are dreaming --
--
588. The Heart asks Pleasure --
first --
--
591. I heard a Fly buzz --
when I died --
--
615. God is a distant --
stately Lover --
--
620. Much Madness is divinest Sense --
--
633. I saw no Way --
The Heavens were stitched --
--
647. To fill a Gap --
664. Rehearsal to Ourselves --
675. What Soft --
Cherubic Creatures --
--
686. It makes no difference abroad --
--
696. The Tint I cannot take --
is best --
--
700. The Way I read a Letter's --
this --
--
706. I cannot live with you --
--
708. They put Us far apart --
--
729. The Props assist the House --
740. On a Columnar Self --
--
747. It's easy to invent a Life --
--
760. Pain --
has an Element of Blank --
--
764. My Life had stood --
a Loaded Gun --
--
772. Essential Oils --
are wrung --
--
778. Four Trees --
upon a solitary Acre --
--782. Renunciation --
is a piercing Virtue --
--
788. Publication --
is the Auction --
790. Growth of Man --
like Growth of Nature --
--
796. The Wind begun to rock the Grass --
800. I never saw a Moor. --
830. The Admirations --
and Contempts --
of time --
--
836. Color --
Caste --
Denomination --
--
857. She rose to His Requirement --
dropt --
861. They say that "Time assuages" --
--
867. I felt a Cleaving in my Mind --
--
895. Further in Summer than the Birds --
--
905. Split the Lark --
and you'll find the Music --
--
926. I stepped from Plank to Plank --
930. The Poets light but Lamps- 935. As imperceptibly as Grief --
962. A Light exists in Spring --
983. Bee! I'm expecting you! --
994. He scanned it --
Staggered --
--
1010. Crubling is not an instant's Act --
1038. Bloom --
is Result --
to meet a Flower --
1064. As the Starved Maelstrom laps the Navies --
1096. A narrow Fellow in the Grass --
1097. Ashes denote the Fire was --
--
1100. The last Night that She lived --
1121. The Sky is low --
the Clouds are mean. --
1142. The murmuring of Bees, has ceased --
1150. These are the Nights that Beetles love --
--
1163. A Spider sewed at Night --
1218. The Bone that has no Marrow, --
1243. Shall I take thee, the Poet said --
1263. Tell all the truth but tell it slant --
--
1268. A Word dropped careless on a Page --
1274. Now I knew I lost her --
--
1279. The things we thought that we should do --
1311. Art thou the thing I wanted? --
1325. I never heard that one is dead --
1332. Abraham to kill him --
1347. Wonder is not precisely knowing --
1369. The Rat is the concisest Tenant. --
1393. Those Cattle smaller than a Bee --
1405. Long Years apart --
can make no --
1408. The Bat is dun, with wrinkled Wings --
--
1428. Lay this Laurel on the one --
1474. The Road was lit with Moon and star --
--
1489. A Route of Evanescence, --
1511. The fascinating chill that Music leaves --
1513. 'Tis whiter than an Indian Pipe --
--
1539. Mine Enemy is growing old --
--
1577. The Bible is an antique Volume --
--
1581. Those --
dying then, --
1593. He ate and drank the precious Words --
--
1618. There came a Wind like a Bugle --
--
1668. Apparently with no surprise --
1715. A word made Flesh is seldom --
1742. In Winter in my Room --
1766. The waters chased him as he fled, --
1771. 'Twas here my summer paused --
1773. My life closed twice before its close; --
1779. To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee.
Andere titels: Poems.
Verantwoordelijkheid: Helen Vendler.

Fragment:

An indispensable reference work for students of Dickinson and readers of lyric poetry. It exhibits many aspects of Dickinson's work as a poet, 'from her first-person poems to the poems of grand  Meer lezen...

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Emily Dickinson is certainly never going to be an easy poet to understand, but her dense, poignant lyrics are now a lot more accessible to ordinary readers thanks to Vendler's unravelings. If you're Meer lezen...

 
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schema:description"935. As imperceptibly as Grief -- 962. A Light exists in Spring -- 983. Bee! I'm expecting you! -- 994. He scanned it -- Staggered -- -- 1010. Crubling is not an instant's Act -- 1038. Bloom -- is Result -- to meet a Flower -- 1064. As the Starved Maelstrom laps the Navies -- 1096. A narrow Fellow in the Grass -- 1097. Ashes denote the Fire was -- -- 1100. The last Night that She lived -- 1121. The Sky is low -- the Clouds are mean. -- 1142. The murmuring of Bees, has ceased -- 1150. These are the Nights that Beetles love -- -- 1163. A Spider sewed at Night -- 1218. The Bone that has no Marrow, -- 1243. Shall I take thee, the Poet said -- 1263. Tell all the truth but tell it slant -- -- 1268. A Word dropped careless on a Page -- 1274. Now I knew I lost her -- -- 1279. The things we thought that we should do -- 1311. Art thou the thing I wanted? -- 1325. I never heard that one is dead -- 1332. Abraham to kill him -- 1347. Wonder is not precisely knowing -- 1369. The Rat is the concisest Tenant. -- 1393. Those Cattle smaller than a Bee -- 1405. Long Years apart -- can make no -- 1408. The Bat is dun, with wrinkled Wings -- -- 1428. Lay this Laurel on the one -- 1474. The Road was lit with Moon and star -- -- 1489. A Route of Evanescence, -- 1511. The fascinating chill that Music leaves -- 1513. 'Tis whiter than an Indian Pipe -- -- 1539. Mine Enemy is growing old -- -- 1577. The Bible is an antique Volume -- -- 1581. Those -- dying then, -- 1593. He ate and drank the precious Words -- -- 1618. There came a Wind like a Bugle -- -- 1668. Apparently with no surprise -- 1715. A word made Flesh is seldom -- 1742. In Winter in my Room -- 1766. The waters chased him as he fled, -- 1771. 'Twas here my summer paused -- 1773. My life closed twice before its close; -- 1779. To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee."@en
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schema:description"420. There are two Ripenings -- -- 423. The first Day's Night had come -- -- 425. 'Twas like a Maelstrom, with a notch, -- 430. A Charm invests a face -- 439. I had been hungry, all the Years -- -- 444. It would have starved a Gnat -- -- 446. This was a Poet -- -- 448. I died for Beauty -- but was scarce -- 450. The Outer -- from the Inner -- 466. I dwell in Possibility -- -- 479. Because I could not stop for Death -- -- 515. There is a pain -- so utter -- -- 517. A still -- Volcano -- Life -- -- 519. This is my letter to the World -- 524. It feels a shame to be Alive -- -- 528. 'Tis not that Dying hurts us so -- -- 533. I reckon -- When I count at all -- -- 550. I measure every Grief I meet -- 558. A Visitor in Marl -- -- 578. The Angle of a Landscape -- -- 584. We dream -- it is good we are dreaming -- -- 588. The Heart asks Pleasure -- first -- -- 591. I heard a Fly buzz -- when I died -- -- 615. God is a distant -- stately Lover -- -- 620. Much Madness is divinest Sense -- -- 633. I saw no Way -- The Heavens were stitched -- -- 647. To fill a Gap -- 664. Rehearsal to Ourselves -- 675. What Soft -- Cherubic Creatures -- -- 686. It makes no difference abroad -- -- 696. The Tint I cannot take -- is best -- -- 700. The Way I read a Letter's -- this -- -- 706. I cannot live with you -- -- 708. They put Us far apart -- -- 729. The Props assist the House -- 740. On a Columnar Self -- -- 747. It's easy to invent a Life -- -- 760. Pain -- has an Element of Blank -- -- 764. My Life had stood -- a Loaded Gun -- -- 772. Essential Oils -- are wrung -- -- 778. Four Trees -- upon a solitary Acre -- --782. Renunciation -- is a piercing Virtue -- -- 788. Publication -- is the Auction -- 790. Growth of Man -- like Growth of Nature -- -- 796. The Wind begun to rock the Grass -- 800. I never saw a Moor. -- 830. The Admirations -- and Contempts -- of time -- -- 836. Color -- Caste -- Denomination -- -- 857. She rose to His Requirement -- dropt -- 861. They say that "Time assuages" -- -- 867. I felt a Cleaving in my Mind -- -- 895. Further in Summer than the Birds -- -- 905. Split the Lark -- and you'll find the Music -- -- 926. I stepped from Plank to Plank -- 930. The Poets light but Lamps-"@en
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