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Did the death of distance hurt Detroit and help New York?

Author: Edward L Glaeser; Giacomo A M Ponzetto; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, 2007.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 13710.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Urban proximity can reduce the costs of shipping goods and speed the flow of ideas. Improvements in communication technology might erode these advantages and allow people and firms to decentralize. However, improvements in transportation and communication technology can also increase the returns to new ideas, by allowing those ideas to be used throughout the world. This paper presents a model that illustrates these  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Glaeser, Edward L. (Edward Ludwig), 1967-
Did the death of distance hurt Detroit and help New York?.
Cambridge, Mass. : National Bureau of Economic Research, 2007
(DLC) 2007616816
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Edward L Glaeser; Giacomo A M Ponzetto; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 186397098
Description: 1 online resource (1 volume).
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), no. 13710.
Responsibility: Edward L. Glaeser, Giacomo A.M. Ponzetto.

Abstract:

Urban proximity can reduce the costs of shipping goods and speed the flow of ideas. Improvements in communication technology might erode these advantages and allow people and firms to decentralize. However, improvements in transportation and communication technology can also increase the returns to new ideas, by allowing those ideas to be used throughout the world. This paper presents a model that illustrates these two rival effects that technological progress can have on cities. We then present some evidence suggesting that the model can help us to understand why the past thirty-five years have been kind to idea-producing places, like New York and Boston, and devastating to goods-producing cities, like Cleveland and Detroit.
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