skip to content
Dime-store alchemy : the art of Joseph Cornell Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Dime-store alchemy : the art of Joseph Cornell

Author: Charles Simic; Joseph Cornell
Publisher: Hopewell, NJ : Ecco Press, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The task Charles Simic undertakes in this diverse, essentially unclassifiable book is one of illumination and tribute. Rather than constrict his response to Joseph Cornell's surreal art to the objective terms of critical analysis, Simic sets out to recreate in a different medium - the written language of the poet - the experience of viewing Cornell's enigmatic constructions of boxes, collages, and film. Partly an  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Simic, Charles, 1938-
Dime-store alchemy.
Hopewell, NJ : Ecco Press, ©1992
(OCoLC)556358873
Named Person: Joseph Cornell; Joseph Cornell; Joseph Cornell; Joseph (Künstler) Cornell
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Charles Simic; Joseph Cornell
ISBN: 0880013036 9780880013031
OCLC Number: 25409432
Description: xvii, 77 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Contents: I. Medici Slot Machine --
II. The Little Box --
III. Imaginary Hotels.
Responsibility: Charles Simic.

Abstract:

The task Charles Simic undertakes in this diverse, essentially unclassifiable book is one of illumination and tribute. Rather than constrict his response to Joseph Cornell's surreal art to the objective terms of critical analysis, Simic sets out to recreate in a different medium - the written language of the poet - the experience of viewing Cornell's enigmatic constructions of boxes, collages, and film. Partly an appreciation of Cornell's work, partly an appropriation of his method, Dime-Store Alchemy interweaves elements of art history, poetry, and biography in a series of short texts that create a kind of poetic equivalent to Cornell's visual art. The artist's premise that the world is beautiful, but not sayable becomes Simic's as well. From incisive meditations on Cornell's methods and aims, Simic moves to create his own assemblages in the spirit of Cornell and the poets he admired - Dickinson, Whitman, and Poe. The resulting prose poems are studded with the same unlikely combinations of found objects and dime-store jewels that inhabit Cornell's boxes. Simic's evocative images, like Cornell's, defy rational explanation but instead invite the viewer to participate in the imaginative life of the art, "to make up stories about what one sees." This highly personal consideration of one of the most important visual artists of the twentieth century conveys the same spirit of chance, the same playful celebration of the miraculous properties of the commonplace, that distinguishes the work of an artist who is, as Simic writes, "in the end unknowable."

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/25409432>
library:oclcnum"25409432"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1992"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1992"
schema:description"I. Medici Slot Machine -- II. The Little Box -- III. Imaginary Hotels."@en
schema:description"The task Charles Simic undertakes in this diverse, essentially unclassifiable book is one of illumination and tribute. Rather than constrict his response to Joseph Cornell's surreal art to the objective terms of critical analysis, Simic sets out to recreate in a different medium - the written language of the poet - the experience of viewing Cornell's enigmatic constructions of boxes, collages, and film. Partly an appreciation of Cornell's work, partly an appropriation of his method, Dime-Store Alchemy interweaves elements of art history, poetry, and biography in a series of short texts that create a kind of poetic equivalent to Cornell's visual art. The artist's premise that the world is beautiful, but not sayable becomes Simic's as well. From incisive meditations on Cornell's methods and aims, Simic moves to create his own assemblages in the spirit of Cornell and the poets he admired - Dickinson, Whitman, and Poe. The resulting prose poems are studded with the same unlikely combinations of found objects and dime-store jewels that inhabit Cornell's boxes. Simic's evocative images, like Cornell's, defy rational explanation but instead invite the viewer to participate in the imaginative life of the art, "to make up stories about what one sees." This highly personal consideration of one of the most important visual artists of the twentieth century conveys the same spirit of chance, the same playful celebration of the miraculous properties of the commonplace, that distinguishes the work of an artist who is, as Simic writes, "in the end unknowable.""@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/8851036>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Dime-store alchemy : the art of Joseph Cornell"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.